Did Rep. Chris Collins sell his biotech stock without telling Congress?

first_img Rep. Chris Collins, the New York lawmaker facing insider trading charges, was once the No. 2 shareholder in an Australian firm called Innate Immunotherapeutics. According to the company’s most recent disclosure, he’s no longer even in the top 20 shareholders.What’s unclear is what happened to his shares. National Biotech Reporter Damian covers biotech, is a co-writer of The Readout newsletter, and a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. By Damian Garde Nov. 12, 2018 Reprints Rep. Chris Collins (R-N.Y.) Win McNamee/Getty Images Damian Garde What’s included? Politics Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Log In | Learn More center_img What is it? Unlock this article — plus daily intelligence on Capitol Hill and the life sciences industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED About the Author Reprints Tags biotechnologyCongressfinance [email protected] Did Rep. Chris Collins sell his biotech stock without telling Congress? @damiangarde GET STARTEDlast_img read more

Chosun Postal Service’s Calendar – February

first_imgNews RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR SHARE By Daily NK – 2005.02.02 12:41pm News News News The month of February has already come to us. The DailyNK introduces February calendar published by the North Korea’s Postal Service, Chosun Woopyo Sa.The 2005 calendar has a picture of a baby for each month. For February, it says, “Mommy , look at me.” Chosun Postal Service’s Calendar – February ▲ The 2005 calendar has a picture of a baby for each month. For February, it says, “Mommy , look at me.”There is a small picture of “Cabin of Baekdu Mountain” where Kim Jong Il is believed to be born. Beside the picture, it says in both Korean and English, “February 16, Juche 31 (2942): The great leader Comrade Kim Jong Il was born.”In North Korea, official holidays noted with red letters in February are 9th Seol (Chinese New Year), 16th, Birthday of Kim Jong Il, and 23rd, The Great Full Moon Day. AvatarDaily NKQuestions or comments about this article? Contact us at [email protected] Entire border patrol unit in North Hamgyong Province placed into quarantine following “paratyphoid” outbreak There are signs that North Korea is running into serious difficulties with its corn harvest Facebook Twitter North Korea tries to accelerate building of walls and fences along border with Chinalast_img read more

Counterparty risk assessments fall short: SSG

first_img Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related news Financial industry regulators still don’t have a complete picture of counterparty risk, says a new report. A group of senior financial supervisors from 10 countries, including Canada, issued a report today, which finds that, while firms have made improvements in assessing counterparty risk, current practices fail to meet the regulators’ expectations, or industry best practices. James Langton The report from the Senior Supervisors Group (SSG), which includes the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI), finds that some firms have met expectations for timeliness and frequency, data aggregation capability, and data quality. However, it notes that other firms have failed to make as much progress as anticipated. “One particular area of concern remains firms’ inability to produce and submit to supervisors high-quality data on a consistent basis,” it says. Indeed, it notes that, “There is much room for improvement.” The report says firms must commit to building the infrastructure necessary to aggregate and update exposures accurately, and in a timely way, including the ability to identify data anomalies. It also recommends that firms continue to prioritize controls and governance, even in times of relatively well-functioning and stable markets; and, that firms should integrate recurring regulatory requests into their ongoing risk management control process, rather than viewing these reports as “one-off” requests. The report calls on regulators to stress the significance of reliable, timely and accurate reporting of counterparty exposure to the firms under their oversight. “Supervisors of systemically important financial institutions and other firms that manage significant numbers or volumes of counterparty exposures should prioritize this effort within the scope of their own work and commit to impressing upon their firms the importance of this expectation,” the report says. It also suggests that supervisors should provide firms with feedback on their data aggregation, reporting, and counterparty risk monitoring abilities. And, the report says that regulators will have to commit more time and resources to the effort, including ongoing assessments of firms’ processes to confirm the validity of the reporting process and the accuracy of the data. “Neither supervisors nor firms should lose sight of this critical piece of risk management, particularly as memories of the financial crisis begin to fade,” it cautions. Pandemic turns banks into prepperscenter_img Keywords Risk managementCompanies Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions The risk of a sudden, severe correction remains: ESMA Elevated risks are here to stay: ESMA Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

RGD Mobile Outreach Teams to Facilitate The Official Naming of 18,000 Children

first_imgRGD Mobile Outreach Teams to Facilitate The Official Naming of 18,000 Children UncategorizedAugust 23, 2006 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Some 34 mobile outreach teams of the Registrar General’s Department (RGD) will be located islandwide to facilitate the official naming of the 18,000 children, whose names are not on their birth records.The teams will visit the main towns and districts in all 14 parishes over a five-week period, beginning September 11, to accept applications relating to the 18,000 children.Following the announcement made by Health Minister, Horace Dalley at the official opening of the Portmore Regional Office last Thursday (August 17), that the Government would assist to underwrite the cost of having the names of the children on the records, the RGD has put in place teams of customer service representatives to meet the people in their communities.“Meet us there,” Chief Executive Officer of the RGD, Dr. Patricia Holness said as she addressed a JIS ‘Think Tank’ yesterday (August 22).“We are asking parents whose children fall within this cohort not to go to our Twickenham Park or other regional offices. We are taking the mobile teams out and we are saying here, we are for you on these two days,” she explained.According to Bryan Aikman, Deputy CEO and Director of Operations at the RGD, “the department has committed itself to naming these 18,000 children who were born between January 1, 2003 and August 31, 2004”.“In addition to posting teams across the island, the RGD will be creating a master list of all the basic schools, targeting the health centres and embarking on an extensive public education campaign to make parents aware of when and where the mobile teams will be and the relevant documents they will need in order to complete the process,” Mr. Aikman continued.Parents will need to provide photo identification, for example, a driver’s licence with a Taxpayer Registration Number (TRN), a national identification card or a current passport. In addition, they will need to produce a copy of the child’s immunization card or the baptismal certificate of the child, in order to complete the naming process, which would cost $500. Originally, the cost of the whole process would have been $2,000.Highlighting the five parishes with the highest number of children without an official name on their birth records, Mr. Aikman cited Kingston with 6,259; St. Ann, 2,124; Manchester, 1,400; St. James, 1,376; and St. Catherine, 1,316. Portland has the least number of cases with 198.Apart from adding the child’s name, Mr. Aikman is also encouraging both parents to attend the prescribed locations to be announced, so that the name of the child’s father and his particulars can be added to the certificate at the same time without additional cost.“We will waive the Late Entry of Name fee of $2,000 and the parents will pay only $500 to process the application. The Government will be underwriting the cost incurred to the sum of $27 million,” Mr. Aikman informed.Additionally, the RGD is appealing to the public to be mindful of the dates and times when they will be visiting the various parishes. “We will be having supplements in the newspapers, promotions on the radio and on television, including the local cable stations, utilizing town criers, posting information on our website as well as that of other government agencies, visiting churches, schools, citizens association meetings and writing letters to the addresses that we have of the mothers of these children at the time of birth,” he outlined.The birth certificates, according to Dr. Holness, would be available at least six weeks after the process is completed and would be delivered to the parents, using the RGD’s courier service system.“Although the birth certificates will not be ready in time for the new school year,” Dr. Holness explained, “the RGD will be arranging with the Ministry of Education to facilitate those children without their birth certificates. Since we do have the names of the parents and the date of birth of the children, special arrangements can be made for these children. We can assure them (the Ministry) that the child will have a name, once the parents appear to have it done”.On a monthly basis, the RGD processes more than 30,000 applications for birth, death and marriage certificates. RelatedRGD Mobile Outreach Teams to Facilitate The Official Naming of 18,000 Children RelatedRGD Mobile Outreach Teams to Facilitate The Official Naming of 18,000 Childrencenter_img Advertisements RelatedRGD Mobile Outreach Teams to Facilitate The Official Naming of 18,000 Childrenlast_img read more

NSW South Coast surfers achieve World Record

first_imgNSW South Coast surfers achieve World Record Killalea National Surfing ReserveNSW South Coast surfers achieve World Record, but organisers accuse State Government of worst ever record on protecting beaches from commercial land grabs.The NSW Berejiklian Government have been accused of burying their heads in the sand by 2000 angry Community members who attended a protest rally at Killalea National Surfing Reserve on Saturday. They gathered in opposition to the increased privatisation of public coastal land at their local beach reserve, and concerns for other coastal hotspots in NSW.The rally followed the successful World Record for the largest paddle out of 682 surfers, from the previous record set by Californian surfers in 2017 of 511. It will be registered with the Guinness World Records before being made official.The vocal community of Shellharbour will continue to block any further privatisation attempts with the backing of State and Federal MP’s who attended and spoke at the Killalea Rally. Protest paddle-out organiser and Chair of the Killalea National Surfing Reserve Committee, Chris Homer, said “Killalea and beach communities including Crescent Head, appear to be under the same threat of carving up protected public assets. “This amounts to coastal privatisation by stealth,” Mr Homer said.Killalea is one of nine National Surfing Reserves in NSW protected under Crown Land legislation, which was passed by Minister Tony Kelly in 2006, to ensure the protection of iconic surfing sites in NSW.Brad Farmer AM, founder of NSR who negotiated the legislation, has demanded the NSW Premier provide an assurance to NSW surfers and beach goers that no further proposals which may encroach on public reserve coastal land takes place.“If NSW is to continue its status as the premier beach state in Australia, Premier BJ needs to properly resource communities and present a comprehensive coastal zone management plan that precludes any further privatisation”, Mr Farmer said.Even iconic Bondi Beach is currently the subject of a DA to allow for an exclusive private beach club on the sands, while at Byron Bay the Shire is struggling to get the State Government to address erosion issues, which threaten its local tourism economy.-Ends- /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, Berejiklian, Byron Bay, california, community, Crescent Head, Federal, Government, legislation, Minister, NSW, Premier, protest, Shellharbour, surfing, tourismlast_img read more

Bumper crowds expected for NRL Magic Round

first_imgBumper crowds expected for NRL Magic Round JOINT STATEMENTPremier Annastacia Palaszczuk today announced more than 90,000 rugby league fans were expected to flock to Brisbane for this weekend’s NRL Magic Round blockbuster at Suncorp Stadium.With strong support from the Palaszczuk Government, all 16 NRL teams will play eight games over three days at Suncorp Stadium from 14-16 May.“Major events pump millions of dollars into our economy and support local jobs. They’re an important part of our plan for economic recovery,” the Premier said.“We worked closely with the NRL to develop the inaugural Magic Round in 2019 because we know events like this drive strong economic outcomes and visitor numbers for our tourism sector.”In 2019, the event pumped more than $20 million into Queensland’s economy and booked out 109,000 room nights for the state’s tourism industry and once again we expect to see a strong turnout this year.“COVID-19 has hit our tourism industry particularly hard,” the Premier said.“This year, we’ve delivered campaigns specifically targeting footy fans in NSW and New Zealand to boost the economic impact of Magic Round and support tourism operators here in Brisbane.“Magic Round will be bigger and better than ever this year.“Football fans can expect a magic weekend, with about 24,000 visitors from interstate and New Zealand travelling to Brisbane for the event.“This means more people in hotel beds, eating out at our world-class restaurants and enjoying the many experiences on offer in Queensland’s capital.”Tourism Minister Stirling Hinchliffe said all sixteen NRL teams will play eight games over three days at Suncorp Stadium from 14-16 May, supported through Tourism and Events Queensland and Brisbane City Council via Brisbane Economic Development Agency.“The grounds team at Suncorp Stadium report the turf is in top condition for 272 pairs of Rugby League boots and a star-studded weekend of first-class football,” Mr Hinchliffe said.“May also delivers the Reds versus the Crusaders at Suncorp Stadium, the Australian Gymnastics Championships on the Gold Coast and the GBR Masters Games in Cairns.“The sport on our major events calendar alone is expected to contribute at least $30 million to support jobs and the Palaszczuk Government’s economic recovery plan.“During May there are plenty of opportunities for basketball, soccer, netball and AFL fans to witness the spectacle of live elite sport.“In May, Queensland is the place to be for magic sporting moments.”NRL CEO Andrew Abdo said Magic Round was a major drawcard for rugby league fans across Australia.“Magic Round is a weekend like no other – 272 players, 16 teams and 8 games all at Suncorp Stadium,” he said.“Magic Round is about the fans. It gives our fans the opportunity to get closer to our players and our activations inside the fan zone will provide incredible insight into our game.“We’re really excited to be returning to Brisbane as a three-day festival of genuine entertainment on and off the field.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:AFL, Australia, Australian, basketball, Brisbane, Cairns, Economic Development, Gold Coast, Government, New Zealand, NSW, Palaszczuk, QLD, Queensland, Rugby, Stirling, Suncorplast_img read more

Comic book care packages connect students across space and time

first_imgPublished: May 19, 2020 • By Kellen Short Sophomore Aristotle Bougas holds items from the care package shipped to his home.Chris Koehler assembles care packages at his home.In mid-April, as instructor Chris Koehler was preparing to remotely teach his “Pathway to Space” class about the role imagination plays in our concept of space, he had an imaginative idea of his own.Despite the remote course format required by the coronavirus pandemic, he once again invited CU Professor William Kuskin, an expert on the history of books, to speak via Zoom on comic books and graphic novels and the role of imagination.And instead of distributing comic books to students at the end of class as he normally would, he mailed them to his students’ homes.“Venturing into the unknown, whether it’s space or whatever career path you’re on, requires you to imagine your own possibilities and create your own realities,” Koehler said. “So comic books bring that to life in many ways.”Koehler, the founder and managing director of CU Boulder’s space minor, raided the bargain bin at Time Warp Comics in Boulder to create care packages with assorted comics, stickers, a personal note and other goodies for more than 100 students. Concerned about virus spread, Koehler carefully assembled the packages wearing a mask, gloves and self-adhesive envelopes–mailing them in time to arrive to students just before the April 16 class session.“I knew that I wanted to try to send students something once I knew we were going to be remote,” Koehler said. “It was personal, and the comments I got back from students were, ‘It made me feel like I was still part of CU’s community, more than just via Zoom.’ It was something personal that they could feel that connection.”Aristotle Bougas, a sophomore majoring in environmental studies, sent a selfie to Koehler after receiving the package at his family home in Durango. He said the course remained a “biweekly escape from reality” even after they transitioned to remote learning, and the package was a part of that.“My siblings gasped that any professor could care about his students the way the Pathway to Space family cares about each,” Bougas said.The comic book care packages were just the latest signal that the Pathway to Space class is not your typical course. Offered to students from any major, the course aims to introduce students to the history, the science and the mystique of the space industry.To achieve that goal, Koehler routinely dresses in costume, asks students to perform skits and treats his classroom like the set of a game show. The course features a “flipped classroom,” where students watch recorded lectures on their own time and use class time for group work and interactive lessons, like talking with guest speakers.For Bougas, the comic books are a cherished gift, made all the more sentimental by the difficulties the students overcame this year.“Making a class as good as Pathway to Space requires a teacher just as nice,” Bougas said. “Many of us were silly as kids, but less can hold that energy and charm like Chris. The feeling of sitting in that class happy to have an hour of fun and inspiring lecture on how we adventure off our planet and into the cosmos is like no other.“Test scores seem tiny when talking about the universe and the collections of star dust in it. He understood that.”Tags:Coronavirus Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via E-maillast_img read more

4-H boy and girl of the year crowned

first_imgAdvertisements Related4-H boy and girl of the year crowned FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail MANDEVILLE — Denbigh High School student, Michael Lewis and Corinaldi Avenue Primary School student, Siegel Allen are the 2011 Jamaica 4-H Clubs Boy and Girl of the Year. The two were crowned at the National Achievement Expo held recently at the Denbigh Showground in Clarendon after their projects were judged to be the most outstanding. Beaming in his achievement, 17-year old Micheal said he worked hard for the title. He stated that his winning poultry project was in keeping with the Ministry of Agriculture’s focus on backyard farming as a means of attaining food security. “Agriculture is very important and as Dr. Christopher Tufton states, we must ‘eat what we grow and grow what we eat’, which I have embraced in the competition through backyard farming,” the proud Clarendon teen said. Twelve-year old Siegel was similarly proud of her project, which focused on getting agricultural lands back into production. The St. James native told JIS News that she wants to see unoccupied agricultural lands put into active use, thereby creating more employment for the nation’s youth and filling the export gap. Jamaica 4-H Clubs Field Services Coordinator for the Central Region, Edith Wiggan, informed that the Girl and Boy of the Year contest is the most competitive of the expo events. She explained that it involved research on the history of the 4-H movement, current affairs and display of leadership by the contestants. “They have to present a project book to show evidence of the projects that they have worked on. It is the event that says ‘I am the best, I am rounded, I am a leader, I know what 4-H has done for me, what it can do for me, what it had done for others and where I can be as a result,” she said. The national expo, held under the theme: ‘Value-added agriculture for youth transformation and entrepreneurship”, showcased the best valued-added products from Parish Achievements Days held across the island recently. There were also displays of food items made from pumpkin, which was the featured produce this year. Several students from across the island copped trophies and other prizes for participating in competitions in sandwich making, cake baking and decorating, agro processing, rabbit care and management, poultry care and management, public speaking, budding and grafting, circumposing and potting. COK Sodality Co-operative Credit Union was a major sponsor of the national expo. Related4-H boy and girl of the year crownedcenter_img Related4-H boy and girl of the year crowned 4-H boy and girl of the year crowned AgricultureApril 23, 2011last_img read more

Sigfox CEO sees all round benefits from Telefonica deal

first_img Previous ArticleUS set to take legal action over Yahoo hacksNext ArticleAT&T targets early standardised 5G launches in 2018 Author EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: Ludovic Le Moan, co-founder and CEO of Sigfox, said a recent deal with Telefonica will offer the operator’s customers a best of both worlds approach to Internet of Things services.Le Moan (pictured) told Mobile World Live the agreement enables Telefonica to use cellular-based IoT infrastructure operating in licensed spectrum to provide high-bandwidth services, and Sigfox’s proprietary low-power, wide-area (LPWA) IoT network running in unlicensed spectrum for less bandwidth-intensive services.“Some use cases require very low bandwidth, because the constraint is very tough in terms of energy” and the costs involved. “But sometimes you have to connect devices that require higher bandwidth”, Le Moan said.The partnership agreement, signed in the run up to Mobile World Congress, also provides Telefonica with an alternative in the event it hits “trouble with the Wi-Fi, LTE-M or 4G” infrastructure. Le Moan said having the ability to offer a backup “can bring out a value”.The executive said the deal with Telefonica is a sign the operator realises “they need to collaborate with LPWA” rather than view companies like Sigfox as competitors. “It’s better to have a complementary solution to provide more opportunities for the IoT market.”Emerging cellular IoT technologies including NB-IoT and LTE-MTC LPWA technology (LTE-M) are “a way to improve some GSM solutions” by cutting the cost and energy consumption. However, Le Moan was confident the emerging technologies remain “too expensive or too energy consuming” to compete in the space Sigfox carved out for itself in LPWA IoT.Click here to access the full interview. Michael doesn’t want to admit that he has been a journalist and editor for close to 20 years covering a diverse set of subjects including shipping and shipbuilding, fixed and mobile telecoms, and motorcycling…More Read more Michael Carroll Español AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 15 MAR 2017 Home Sigfox CEO sees all round benefits from Telefonica dealcenter_img Tags Telefonica bolsters blockchain security Telefónica refuerza la seguridad de las cadenas de bloques Luz verde a la fusión entre Telefónica y Liberty Global en el Reino Unido Related IoTLPWASigfoxTelefonicalast_img read more

Fritsch returns from suspension, but drug policy still flawed

first_imgAt the Monday qualifier for this week’s Valspar Championship, Brad Fritsch shot 5-over 77, a round that most players would rather forget. But for Fritsch all 77 strokes were meaningful. Although he finished well outside the top 4 qualifiers who earned a spot into this week’s field, simply having the chance to tee it up at Southern Hills Plantation in Brooksville, Fla., was a reason to celebrate. Monday’s qualifier was Fritsch’s first official PGA Tour-sanctioned round since being suspended on Jan. 8 for violating the circuit’s anti-doping policy. Fritsch told GolfChannel.com that he spent his time away from golf with his family, practiced when the weather allowed and occasionally checked social media. “On Twitter the responses [to his suspension] were 99.9 percent positive,” said Fritsch, who also participated in last weekend’s Puerto Rico Open charity event. “The way the news came out and the way I presented my story, people appreciated it.” Fritsch, who, when his suspension was announced, took to social media to explain his situation, never made any excuses. He never blamed the system or attempted to avoid responsibility. Nor did he ever fail one of the Tour’s mandated drug tests. Fritsch turned himself in when he discovered a supplement he was taking to lose weight (BioSom) contained DHEA, an over-the-counter anabolic agent that is the precursor to testosterone production and banned by the Tour. “It was my own fault,” he acknowledged. Fritsch became the sixth player suspended by the Tour for violating the anti-doping policy, although Vijay Singh’s suspension was later rescinded. Of that half dozen, there is a pattern that has emerged. Just two of those players – Doug Barron (2009) and Bhavik Patel (2015), a Web.com Tour member – would qualify as anything close to bona fide violations. Barron failed a drug test and in a statement following his suspension Patel referred to a “lapse of judgment.” But Singh, Mark Hensby, Scott Stallings and now Fritsch would all fall into more non-traditional categories. Singh admitted in an article to taking deer-antler spray, which contained trace elements of IGF-1, which is on the Tour’s list of banned substances but is not considered a violation without a positive drug test. In 2017, Hensby was suspended for a year when he declined to take a drug test at the Sanderson Farms Championship. And Stallings – well this is where things really get surreal – was suspended for 90 days for taking DHEA, which he self-reported. Sound familiar? It’s what makes Fritsch’s brush with the anti-doping policy so puzzling because for the second time in less than three years an innocent mistake involving the same substance cost a player. “My situation and Brad’s were similar, the Tour sets a policy and we’re supposed to abide by it, but Brad would probably tell you he’s not in the greatest shape and when I was going through my health issues I definitely wasn’t either,” Stallings said. “We clearly weren’t trying to gain any kind of advantage on our peers. We were trying to do things we needed to do to live a normal life.” After three months of reflection, Fritsch said he had “nothing negative” to say about the Tour’s performance-enhancing drug policy; although, like many players he believes parts of the banned list, which is pulled from the World Anti-Doping Agency’s list, could be better tailored to golf. “I’d like to see us get away from the list we have,” Fritsch said. “So much is for fast-twitch sports. To think Sudafed [pseudoephedrine] is on the list is strange to me.” Stallings, however, has taken a slightly more analytical approach to the Tour’s policy. It still stings the three-time Tour winner that despite multiple tests, both blood and urine, he’d taken at the Mayo Clinic while he was taking DHEA that indicated no doping, he was still suspended. “I asked, ‘How can you take something that’s banned and pass [multiple] tests?’ I was just trying to understand why we have it in the policy, because not only did I pass your test but I went and paid for the Mayo Clinic to run an Olympic test – blood and urine – and I passed that,” Stallings said. “I asked for a meeting, and walked in and was handed a letter telling me I was suspended and [then-Tour commissioner Tim] Finchem looked at me directly and said, ‘I believe you were trying to gain an advantage.’” Like Fritsch, Stallings took full responsibility for his actions despite the fact that a doctor had advised him to take DHEA. At this point, it’s not about guilt or innocence as much as it is an attempt to understand a policy that can be downright Draconian. The Tour’s anti-doping policy can be confusing and, as evidenced by at least four of the six suspensions doled out since the circuit began testing in 2008, can lead to unfortunate violations. Perhaps the biggest concern is that the policy is not entirely transparent. Violations involving what are considered performance-enhancing substances are made public, but not recreational violations. There’s also a question of selective enforcement. According to the policy, “The Commissioner, in consultation with the program administrator, shall consider any information submitted by the player and shall then decide whether to go forward with an anti-doping rule violation against the player.” This is one of the key elements of Singh’s lawsuit against the Tour, which was filed in New York Supreme Court in 2013 and claimed, among other things, disparate treatment of players under the policy. “There’s not a perfect scenario that works, but as long as the policy still grants the commissioner discretion to do whatever he wants, the policy is irrelevant to me,” Stallings said. “They can say they are WADA compliant, but when that caveat is in there it throws a grey area over the whole thing.” Drug testing in golf, which holds itself to a higher standard than other sports, was always going to be an awkward fit, and as Stallings correctly points out there’s still plenty of room for improvement.last_img read more