WFP Geneva Palais Briefing Note: World Food Programme warns of looming famine in southern Madagascar

first_imgWFP Geneva Palais Briefing Note: World Food Programme warns of looming famine in southern Madagascar WFPThis is a summary of what was said by WFP Senior Director of Operations Amer Daoudi – to whom quoted text may be attributed – at today’s press briefing at the Palais des Nations in Geneva, Switzerland.GENEVA – I’m currently in Madagascar. I arrived a couple of days ago to see first-hand the deteriorating humanitarian situation in southern Madagascar. The issue is no longer about how bad it is – it is extremely bad.Famine looms in southern Madagascar as communities witness an almost total disappearance of food sources which has created a full-blown nutrition emergency. People have had to resort to desperate survival measures such as eating locusts, raw red cactus fruits or wild leaves.At least 1.35 million people need emergency food and nutrition assistance and have been suffering from hunger since the start of the lean season last September (IPC December 2020). The lives of children are at stake as the nutrition situation in under-fives deteriorates to alarming levels. Most of the southern districts are in a nutrition emergency as acute malnutrition has almost doubled over the last 4 months, increasing from 9% to 16%. (Ministry of Health Survey, March 2021) In some districts it has reached even worse than the alarming 16% to almost 27%. So, the average is 16% across all districts but in couple of districts it’s almost 27%. Some of the reasons behind all of this is in the past five years we’ve had consecutive droughts, climate shocks, economic deterioration but also this year we had unexpected sandstorms that basically rendered many of the agricultural lands not available (or fit) for farming. In addition, we had very little rains, late rains and today the expectations of the harvest is going to be at almost 40% below the 5 year average. So it tells you how bad the situation is and WFP has been responding with partners and trying to minimize the impact but due to lack of resources we have been providing only half rations across the community up to the tune of 750,000 people.The main urban centers which have been receiving displaced population due to food insecurity and malnutrition are Ambovombe, Amboasary, and Fort Dauphin (up to 3,000 people of which 80 percent were women and children reached Fort Dauphin in the last months).But what I witnessed yesterday again with members of the diplomatic community and the international community and members of the government is horrific images of starving and malnourished children, mothers, parents and the population in the villages we visited – Ankiliabo in the Ambovombe district. The situation has extremely, extremely worsened, scary. They are on the periphery of famine and these are images that I haven’t seen for quite some time from across the globe.Now, we need to stop the deterioration and for that we need the resources yesterday. Because in order to turn resources into food into the mouth of people it will take some time. The infrastructure is extremely bad. It takes forever to get cargo into Madagascar and then from the ports into affected areas given that how large the area is and how dispersed the population are.I would urge everybody to try and help with the situation – it has extremely worsened. When heads of households, when mothers start selling their cooking utensils – this is the sign we are reaching the point of no return. I would urge for everybody’s assistance in this crisis.The writing is on the wall, the images are horrific and what I saw with my own eyes tells me that we are heading towards a disaster and we need to stop that. We are asking for US$75 million immediately to cover the needs over the next few months. What we have in place today is sufficient up to July at half ration and that’s not going to be enough. Half ration is basically that you are sustaining, and you are not alleviating the suffering. And we need USD 75 million immediately.In normal circumstances, with relatively good infrastructure, usually to turn cash, confirmed contributions into food in the mouth of people usually takes three to five months. The situation has extremely worsened, the urgency is there so we will put all our efforts to be able to move and deliver once we have the contributions. But we need the contributions yesterday – each day we are late means we are not going with food and nutrition distributions to the affected population.The infrastructure is almost non-existent. Yesterday to travel from where we arrived in the Ambovombe district to the village of Ankiliabo took us one hour and a half by car – totally off road. So, you can imagine the distance and the remoteness of the villages.In some of these villages, in many of these villages, as you all know, basically, if a child dies, they bury the child, there is no reporting on these numbers. Same thing with grownups. We are already witnessing whole villages shutting down and moving to urban centres. This puts pressure on an already fragile food security situation. People are sick. This response isn’t only about food and nutrition, it’s very much about health, very much about water, it’s all hands-on deck.Unfortunately, I have come across many dire situations in my life. What the images I saw yesterday are up there in terms of the severity and how shocking it is. However, I want to highlight in almost 30 years of doing emergencies and humanitarian work, I think from where I sit, from the kind of global view I have the situation now is bad globally.I saw starving children, absolutely, absolutely skin and bones, stunting … when we asked some of the mothers how is the situation, how are they coping, they get the supplementary feeding we provide to children and mothers – they said they’ve resorted to selling their cooking utensils. They have nothing. They are destitute. It’s not like there is a coping mechanism because it is affecting a swath of villages. This is what I saw. I had one mother with a 7-8 month old child who looked like he was 2 months old. She told me that she lost a child just last week. The situation is really bad. The remoteness of these villages, the accessibility problem is hindering us from transmitting all these images globally, but the writing is on the wall. It is very clear how disturbing the situation is.Please find images of the situation in southern Madagascar here /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Accessibility, community, diplomatic, director, Emergency, Geneva, Government, health, Humanitarian, infrastructure, Madagascar, nutrition, resources, Switzerland, U.S., WFPlast_img read more

Course on Reparation to be Taught at UWI

first_imgCourse on Reparation to be Taught at UWI CultureAugust 2, 2013Written by: Elaine Hartman Reckord RelatedThousands Attend Independence Grand Gala Photo: JIS PhotographerLecturer in the Department of Government at the University of the West Indies (UWI), Dr. Clinton Hutton (left), speaking at a Jamaica Information Service (JIS) Think Tank held recently at the agency’s head office in Kingston. Listening is Chairperson, National Commission on Reparations, Professor Verene Shepherd. RelatedFocus on Youth in Agriculture at Denbigh Story HighlightsA course on reparation will shortly be offered at UWI, MonaThe curriculum will examine the argument for reparation within a historical contextIt is important to educate the Caribbean population about the issues of slavery and reparation RelatedCulture Minister Impressed With Number of Young People at Vigilcenter_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Advertisements Course on Reparation to be Taught at UWIJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay A course on reparation, looking at the issue of compensation for slavery in the Caribbean, will shortly be offered at the University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona.The course is being designed by Lecturer in the Department of Government in Political Philosophy and Culture, Dr. Clinton Hutton.Speaking at a Jamaica Information Service (JIS) Think Tank recently, Dr. Hutton informed that the curriculum will examine the argument for reparation within a historical context.He said it is important to educate the Caribbean population about the issues of slavery and reparation, as many young people still do not see a connection between themselves and their enslaved ancestors.“In other words, they are unable to feel empathy for their own ancestors,” he stated, noting that the same lack of feeling displayed for our ancestors is the same that the Europeans had towards black people.Dr. Hutton said that during his lectures, some students have argued that the reason their foreparents were enslaved was because they were uneducated.He argued, however, that some of the people, who came across the Middle Passage, were state makers, scientists and highly skilled persons.“In fact, the reason for Europeans going to Africa was that Africa was rich in tropical agriculture and not because of the physical makeup of our ancestors,” he stated.“We need to walk through the passages that our ancestors walked, and we can only do that if we educate ourselves,” he added.Education, Dr. Hutton argued further, will also generate a bigger and growing political voice to support the work of the National Commission for Reparations (NCR). “I have no doubt that if the people are educated they will begin to think differently,” he said.Last year, the NCR was reconvened under the leadership of UWI Professor Verene Shepherd, to among other things, advise the government on the case for reparation and to recommend the form or forms, which reparations may take.The Commission is also mandated to receive testimony from the public and from experts with the aim of guiding a national approach to reparations.last_img read more

Over $28M Allocated to Improve Sanitation and Management of Pedro Cays

first_imgRelatedRefurbished Community Centre and Sports Complex Handed Over at Toll Gate RelatedGovernment Provides $7.5M to Assist Agro Park Farmers in St. Thomas FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Government has allocated more than $28 million to address waste management, and to beef up fisheries monitoring and enforcement on the Northeast and Middle Cays of the Pedro Banks.Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Roger Clarke, who made the disclosure on Thursday, January 9, informed that the financing was provided through the Fisheries Management and Development Fund, as well as the Fisheries Division.He was addressing a workshop to discuss the findings of the ‘2013 Socio-economic Survey and Carrying Capacity Study of the Northeast and Middle Cays, Pedro Banks’ at the Mona Visitors’ Lodge, on the Mona campus of the University of the West Indies (UWI).The study was commissioned by the Ministry and carried out by a team of researchers from the UWI during 2013.Mr. Clarke said the findings of the research, along with others that were conducted before, such as work done by environmentalist, Peter Espeut, will inform the development of a comprehensive management plan for the Northeast and Middle Cays.The results and recommendations generated from the study, he noted, will advance Government’s efforts to achieve true sustainable use of the area.The Government, over the last year, has allocated funds to address poor sanitary and environmental conditions at Pedro Cays and has also intensified enforcement activities, to ensure that only people in possession of fishing licences are allowed to remain on the Cays.Mr. Clarke said that there is still much work to be done to bring the management of the cays to an acceptable level, and remove the solid waste from the area.In highlighting findings from the socio-economic survey and desk study, Consultant from the UWI’s Department of Geography and Geology, Dr. Kevon Rhiney, informed that at the time of the survey there were some 205 people living in the area for as much as nine months out of the year.He, however, pointed out that based on anecdotal evidence; this number could be as much as 300 to 400 at certain periods, especially during peak seasons.He informed that the study found that waste disposal; sanitation, particularly as it relates to access to toilet infrastructure; and the availability of clean drinking water are major challenges on the cays.“The problem of solid waste management gets even worse during the peak conch and lobster seasons, because what you find is that during those seasons you get more fishers going on the cays and so you get a greater generation of solid waste,” he pointed out.Dr. Rhiney informed that based on the findings, it was recommended that there needed to be stricter control in terms of the number of fishers that reside and operate from the cays as well as the provision of adequate sanitary facilities.It was also suggested that a sustainable and effective governance and settlement structure is put in place to guide the way in which the resources on the cays are used.The Northeast and Middle Cays of the Pedro Cays are often used by local fishers as a base for their fishing operations on the Pedro Bank.The location is widely regarded as Jamaica’s most productive fishing area, from which the vast majority of the country’s most valuable fishery export products, such as spiny lobsters and queen conch, are harvested. Story HighlightsMore than $28 million to address waste management, and to beef up fisheries monitoring and enforcement on the Northeast and Middle Cays of the Pedro Banks.Financing was provided through the Fisheries Management and Development Fund, as well as the Fisheries Division.The Government, over the last year, has allocated funds to address poor sanitary and environmental conditions at Pedro Cays and has also intensified enforcement activities. Photo: JIS PhotographerMinister of Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Roger Clarke (right), converses with Chairman, National Resources Conservation Authority (NRCA) John Junor, during a validation workshop on the results of the ‘2013 Socio-economic Survey and Carrying Capacity Study of the Northeast and Middle Cays, Pedro Banks’ held on Thursday, January 9, at the Mona Visitors’ Lodge on the Mona campus of the University of the West Indies (UWI).center_img Over $28M Allocated to Improve Sanitation and Management of Pedro CaysJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Over $28M Allocated to Improve Sanitation and Management of Pedro Cays AgricultureJanuary 14, 2014Written by: Athaliah Reynolds-Baker RelatedBig Boost for Cassava Production Advertisementslast_img read more

250 Unattached Youth Benefit From Information Technology Training

first_img250 Unattached Youth Benefit From Information Technology Training TechnologyJuly 21, 2015Written by: Chad Bryan 250 Unattached Youth Benefit From Information Technology TrainingJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay RelatedSpanish Town Hospital Gets Energy-Efficient Air Conditioning System RelatedEnergy Sector Poised For Major Transformation RelatedComputer Lab At Refuge Temple Learning Academy Officially Opened Photo: JIS PhotographerSutherland Community Technology Centre (CTC) Manager, Paula Hurlock (left), presents Minister of State in the Ministry of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Hon. Julian Robinson with a certificate of appreciation. Occasion was the CTC graduation ceremony held on July 20 at the Mona Baptist Church, University Meadows, Kingston 6. Over 250 unattached young people have been equipped with information technology skills through the programme.center_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Story HighlightsOver 250 unattached young people have been equipped with information technology skills through the Sutherland Community Technology Centre (CTC) programme.The young people, from inner city communities spread across Kingston and St. Andrew, St. Catherine and Clarendon, benefitted from a free three-day online course in computer, Microsoft and Internet literacy held at the Mona Baptist Church, St. Andrew.They were presented with Microsoft Digital Literacy Programme certificates at a graduation ceremony held on the church grounds on July 20. Over 250 unattached young people have been equipped with information technology skills through the Sutherland Community Technology Centre (CTC) programme.The young people, from inner city communities spread across Kingston and St. Andrew, St. Catherine and Clarendon, benefitted from a free three-day online course in computer, Microsoft and Internet literacy held at the Mona Baptist Church, St. Andrew.They were presented with Microsoft Digital Literacy Programme certificates at a graduation ceremony held on the church grounds on July 20.Minister of State in the Ministry of Science, Technology, Energy and Mining, Hon. Julian Robinson, was on hand to present the certificates and commended the graduates.Sutherland Global Services’ Talent Acquisition Coordinator, Somalia Francis, who delivered the main address at the graduation ceremony, urged the young people to use the opportunity provided by the training to chart their success.“Let this be the starting point of your success. This is not the finishing line. The path to your dreams won’t be easy,” she said.Ms. Francis also told the graduates that they should never allow themselves to be stigmatised or make the mistake of listening to negative people.The CTC is a corporate social outreach of Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) company Sutherland Global Services, and involves partnership with Microsoft.The aim is to strengthen the technical knowledge base of local, underprivileged communities. The digital literacy curriculum consists of course material provided by Microsoft Learning and is designed to increase basic computer awareness and provide students with advanced computer skills aimed at increasing their employability.A total of 131 young people graduated from a similar training course in December 2014, with 30 of them placed in internships at the Mona offices of Sutherland Global Services.A cohort of Monday’s graduates will also benefit from internships with the BPO. Through partnership with HEART Trust/NTA, these young people will also be trained.Twenty-year-old Dellano Skeen, who is a graduate of the programme and is interning with Sutherland Global, is elated at the opportunity.“It’s a pleasure being at Sutherland Global Services. It’s a company with a lot of breathing space for growth,” said Skeen, who is a resident of Chambers Lane, Kingston 6.The CTC programme has also impacted the lives of about 10 persons with disabilities as well as 12 teenage mothers, one of whom is now interning at Sutherland Global Services. Advertisementslast_img read more

Start It Up

first_imgOCALA, Fla. – Fire and ice. It’s a pretty good show if you can catch it. The fiery Stacy Lewis vs. the unflappable Lydia Ko. The Coates Golf Championship featured the touring production in a pairing over its first two rounds, and the duo didn’t disappoint. They usually don’t. They’re in contention together yet again for another LPGA title. While much is made of the emerging rivalry between Inbee Park and Lewis, you could make an argument that the veteran Lewis and the youthful Ko are laying a solid foundation for a meaningful rivalry of their own. They seem to bring out the best in each other in their unusually frequent pairings, and they’re doing it again. With Golden Ocala playing tough Thursday, Lewis moved into contention with a 2-under-par 70 in the LPGA’s season opener. She sits in second place, four shots behind rookie Ha Na Jang, who made an impressive afternoon charge with a 7-under-par 65 to get to 12 under overall. Ko (69) was tied for third, five shots behind Jang. If Lewis and Ko can catch the impressive Jang and take their act into the final round, there may be a lot more at stake than a trophy and a $225,000 winner’s check. With Inbee Park off to a sluggish start, Lewis and Ko are in position to seize the Rolex No. 1 world ranking from Park. Ko entered the week at No. 2 in the world with Lewis at No. 3. If Ko wins the Coates Golf Championship, she moves to No. 1 no matter what Park or Lewis do. If Lewis wins, she moves to No. 1 if Park finishes eighth or worse and Ko finishes in a three-way tie for second or worse. Park shot 75 Thursday and sat more than a dozen shots off the lead. Lewis, 29, has had a front-row seat for the remarkably swift ascendance of Ko, 17. When Ko became the youngest winner of an LPGA event, taking the trophy at the CN Canadian Pacific Women’s Open when she was just 15, she did so playing alongside Lewis in the final round. When Ko won the Swinging Skirts Classic in San Francisco last year, she played all four rounds with Lewis. Though Lewis wasn’t paired with Ko in final round of the Walmart NW Arkansas Championship last summer, she overtook her and Cristie Kerr in a dramatic back-nine battle to win by a shot. Lewis and Ko have dueled more than Lewis and Park have. When the 2014 season ended at the CME Group Tour Championship, they shared the spotlight. Lewis swept the Rolex Player of the Year Award, Vare Trophy and the money-winning title. Ko took home the richest payday in the history of women’s golf, claiming CME’s $1 million season-long points bonus and the $500,000 CME Group Tour Championship. Lewis said their games set up well together. “We play well on the same type of golf courses,” Lewis said. “You look at this one, and San Francisco, a tree-lined golf course, you’ve got to hit it on the right spot on the greens, play smart. I think our games are just really similar, so we play well on the same courses.” Ko seems to relish playing alongside Lewis. There’s mutual respect. They appear to have a lot to talk about. They were chatting amiably up more than one fairway again Thursday. “She’s a great kid,” Lewis said. “She usually has a few good stories to tell here and there. She’s fun, easy to play with.” But not easy to beat. “Stacy has played great every single time I’ve played with her,” Ko said. “I kind of try and feed off her, and she’s someone I look up to, and I always learn. She’s such a confident player. I always enjoy playing with her. Yeah, it’s always fun whenever I get paired up with Stacy.” They’ll be looking to have some fun trying to beat each other again at Golden Ocala this week.last_img read more

Hard Working Americans – Hard Working Americans

first_imgLooking for some authentic, down-home rock ‘n roll? Well, who better to play it for you than some Hard Working Americans, the true champion of the southern rock music.The Hard Working Americans are making a splash with their self-titled debut album, and, well, credit earned where credit is due. Hard Working Americans is a strong showing of musical prowess and enthusiasm, capably bouncing between high-octane rockers and bourbon-soaked ballads. The cohesion of this album lies in its honesty; this is a band eager to share their music with the world.First thing’s first. H.W.A. was created by Southern rock singer Todd Snider, and features bassist Dave Schools (Widespread Panic), guitarist Neal Casal (Ryan Adams/Chris Robinson), keyboardist Chad Staehly (Great American Taxi), and drummer Duane Trucks (Derek Trucks’ brother, Butch Trucks’ nephew). Of the band, Snider said, “I’ve been standing in between these two worlds (of Americana and jam bands), thinking that the people in each of them were meant for each other.”He further elaborated, saying that “the songwriters in the Americana world were spending as much time on their poems as the jam bands spend on their tones and their solos. Why not put these things together? Why not combine the best songwriters with the best musicians?”It’s a good point, considering that “bag it, tag it, sell it to the butcher in the store” isn’t the most profound of sentiments. On the album, the band reinterprets blue-collar tunes, drawing from renowned artists like Randy Newman, country musician Frankie Miller, and many more. It’s groovy, to say the least.The album kicks off with a beckoning electric guitar riff, quickly accompanied by a rolling drum beat and smooth singing. “When the lord made me, he made a simple man/ Not much money, and not much land/ He didn’t make no banker, no legal charmer/ When the lord made me, he made a blackland farmer.” Yeah. “Blackland Farmer” is that kind of bluesy groove, accentuated by poignant piano and sliding guitar fills. All smooth, all the time.But Hard Working Americans isn’t entirely gritty southern blues. Two songs later, we get The Hard Working American’s rendition of Kevin Gordon’s “Down to the Well,” a slower, more contemplative track. While some songs on the album are rockers, this (and others) are swayers… moments made for holding up a lighter and dancing along. The slide guitar work and piano accompaniment on “Down to the Well” draw out the emotion, with sweet, lingering tones that soothe the soul.I can’t do this album justice without mentioning “Stomp & Holler,” a Hayes Carll song brought to life with a boogie-woogie piano line and powerful harmonica playing. Maybe I’m a sucker for the harmonica solo, but it gets me every time. Here, just listen to the song for yourself:Hard Working Americans is a real tribute to Southern rock and blues music, in the tradition of bands like the Allman Brothers and Lynyrd Skynyrd. But, rather than sounding derivative, The Hard Working Americans infuse this earnest genre with life. It’s a great, great album.You can stream the album in its entirety, through PopMatters, by following this link.-David Melamed (@DMelamz)last_img read more

Nutrigenomics – The game changer for animal agriculture

first_imgWhen it comes to “game changers,” the dairy industry has seen its fair share.The science behind creating a gallon of milk continues to change rapidly, thanks to new technologies, and with the push for efficient and profitable operations in the current marketplace, nutrigenomics is today’s game changer producers need to consider.advertisementadvertisement Kate Jacques, director of nutrition at animal health and nutrition company Alltech , spoke to more than 500 progressive beef and dairy producers at Alltech’s Global 500 event in December.Nutrigenomics, the study of how diet affects the gene expression, is something Jacques said will change how the agricultural world thinks about nutrition.Jacques held up a small gene chip for the audience. “There are a very large number of genes that can be measured at once in this small chip, allowing biologists to measure animal responses to diet at the gene level,” Jacques explained. “We need to know a lot more about how all of this works if we expect to get more meat and more milk out of our animals.”All cells have a complete set of chromosomes with identical genes, but only a fraction of these genes are expressed resulting in protein production. The gene chip gives scientists a way to measure which genes are activated to produce proteins in response to specific nutrient regimens.advertisementJacques said this newfound ability to observe which genes are affected by nutrition has the potential to revolutionize our approach to managing animal nutrition.It marks a shift in industry mindset from simply getting more nutrients into the animal to understanding the degree nutrients affect animal production at the cell and tissue level.Scientists have found nutrients are “gene switches” that regulate bio-functions in animals. With this precise science, researchers can now find solutions that will improve animal performance and product quality.“It’s not the genetics, health, environment or nutrition alone that is limiting, it’s how they interact and how we develop solutions based on those interactions,” Jacques said.Gene chip technology will also have a large effect on traditional animal testing. This new technology offers economic efficiency for producers since the chip acts as a library that can be used to answer numerous difficult questions more quickly than ongoing, expensive field tests.Jacques said more scientists are also realizing it’s not only which nutrients are fed to animals that make a difference, but also the timing as to when animals receive those nutrients.advertisementFetal programming is nothing new to the human or animal sciences, but taking the epigenetic data – transferable and heritable changes on gene expression from outside the DNA sequence – and learning how to use nutrition to the producers’ advantage provides a new opportunity for improving feed efficiency and growth rates.“Genetic advances have given us better animals, but it is gene expression that drives performance and profits,” Jacques said. “Nutrigenomics research is key to narrowing genetics and nutritional gaps, and in turn, will redefine our understanding of nutritional requirements.” PDAmy Schutte is Alltech Idaho’s territory marketing coordinator. Click here for more information about Alltech.PHOTOSTOP RIGHT: Kate Jacques, director of nutrition for Alltech, spoke to more than 500 progressive beef and dairy producers at Alltech’s Global 500 event in December. Photo courtesy of Alltech.Amy SchutteMarketing CoordinatorAlltechlast_img read more

Atletico’s Filipe Luis: says in Spain Lionel Messi is ‘the protected one’

first_img The Brazilian received a red card for his challenge and a one match ban, while, luckily, Messi was not injured. It’s been a few weeks since the incident, but Luis has now given his opinion on what happened.  07/03/2016 “[In Spain] he is ‘the protected one’ by the press and La Liga. Obviously nobody wants one of the best players of all time to be out and miss the opportunity to see him playing, that’s where all of this came from. “It was an error, but they’ve crucified me for it and it’s been a little excessive.” “I didn’t arrive late, I went for the ball, but I admit it was a red,” he said. “But this was with Messi, even though this tackle happens in every game. Upd. at 15:10 Barcelona fans held their breath in the 44th minute of the recent game between the Catalan side and Atletico Madrid when Filipe Luis clattered into Lionel Messi’s knee.  CET In quotes to Brazilian TV’s Esporte Interactivo he admits he deserved a red card, but also said he’s convinced there’s a campaign to protect the Barça star.  “I felt really down. I didn’t want to read the press, but in the end it reaches you: ‘the press are calling you a murderer, a criminal.’ But my conscience is clear because I never wanted to do any damage. Sport ENlast_img read more