Liberia A ‘Center for Human Trafficking’?

first_imgThe National Secretariat of Trafficking in Person (TIP) working with the Ministry of Labor has identified the South-eastern region of the country as the area from which most children trafficked to Monrovia and other cities originate.The disclosure was made last Wednesday in Monrovia at a one-day workshop organized for journalists by World Hope International (WHI).Adolphus G. Satiah of the National Secretariat for TIP emphasized that most children his organization has identified in Monrovia as being trafficked come from Grand Gedeh, Maryland, River Gee and Sinoe counties.He said parents of some of the trafficked children give them to either relatives or friends who promise to send them to school, but on the contrary, the children end up being used as domestic servants.“Most people in those South-eastern counties are poor so they sometimes give their children to people living in urban areas, especially in Monrovia, hoping they would be sent to school, but instead, many are made to work without going to the school,” Mr. Satiah said.He said they have found out in Monrovia and Bomi County from investigations that most of the children selling in the streets and burning coal trace their backgrounds from the South-eastern region with a few from Nimba and Lofa Counties.Mr. Satiah also pointed out that Liberia is recorded in a U.S. State Department report as the center for trafficking. He said in Liberia, traffickers from other parts of the world bring trafficked persons and take them to various destinations around the world.He said human trafficking is illegal and is prohibited by law in Liberia, and urged journalists and the public to take keen note and report cases of trafficking to th relevant authorities.For his part, World Hope International Program Manager, Wellington A. Kollie, defined trafficking in persons to be “Modern day slavery,” noting that trafficking is identified by the act, means and purpose.He said the act involves the recruiting process, the means as the pretense under which recruitment is done and the purpose serving as the reasons for taking the recruits to the intended destinations.He clarified that obtaining a person through deception, force or coercion for the purpose of exploitation in all forms constitutes human trafficking.Mr. Kollie said children less than 18 years have been trafficked from one place to the other in the country to work on farms, sell in the streets, beg, burn charcoal and mine minerals in the bush.He also said young girls are also trafficked and prostituted in hotels and bars in Monrovia, and areas where diamond and gold are mined in the country.Earlier, Mr. Kollie said young people (males and females) were trafficked for war and ritual purpose.He said because of the horrific increase in human trafficking in Liberia with the propensity to undermine the economy and human capita, the media needs to be proactive to report cases through proper investigation.In consonance with presentations from the two men, U.S. State Department of 2015 about Liberia states, “Liberia is a source and destination country for men, women, and children subjected to forced labor and sex trafficking. Most trafficking victims originate from and are exploited within the country’s borders, where they are subjected to domestic servitude, forced begging, sex trafficking, or forced labor in street vending, alluvial diamond mines, and on rubber plantations. Traffickers typically operate independently and are commonly family members, who promise poorer relatives a better life for their children. Children sent to work as domestic servants for their wealthier relatives are vulnerable to forced labor or, to a lesser extent, sexual exploitation.Orphaned children remain susceptible to exploitation, including in street selling and prostitution.A small number of Liberian men, women, and children are subjected to human trafficking in other West African countries, including Cote d’Ivoire, Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Nigeria. Victims of transnational trafficking come to Liberia from neighboring West African countries, including Sierra Leone, Guinea, Cote d’Ivoire, and Nigeria, and are subjected to the same types of exploitation as internally trafficked victims. Women from Tunisia and Morocco have been subjected to sex trafficking in Liberia. During the reporting period, Liberian women were subjected to forced labor in Lebanon. Bribery at border stations, capacity issues, and generalized corruption within the judiciary continued to hamper trafficking investigations and prosecutions.”Mrs. Princess Taire, Deputy Program Manager of World Hope International emphasized the need for confidentiality in dealing with victims of trafficking.Mrs. Taire stressed that trafficking victims are maltreated that they become traumatized, and exposing them without their consent causes more harm to them.She said while journalists are to report facts, it is expedient for them to work with trafficking victims like trained social workers, who observe ethical guidelines of confidentiality that prevents victims from exposure.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Mockery of justice

first_imgThe point of putting people into jail is to punish them for wrongdoing and deter them and others from similar behavior in the future. If judges are using meaningless jail time as a symbolic punishment or to cover up their unwillingness to treat celebrities like the rest of us, then maybe it’s time to re-evaluate our correctional priorities – as well as to re-examine what kind of people are appointed to the judiciary. JUST hours after the most recent scofflaw starlet was sentenced, people were already discussing whether, once again, justice was applied unevenly. Depending on whom you ask, Lindsay Lohan’s one-day jail sentence Thursday – coupled with community service, rehab and probation – was either celebrity justice, symbolic, or about right for a first-time offender. And Nicole Richie’s 82-minute stay (of a four-day jail sentence) in county jail added the final spice. Looking past the immediate argument of whether celebrities are treated the same as regular folks when getting punished is the larger question of the point of a one-day jail sentence, let alone 82 minutes. How many of the already-thin county resources went into processing Richie into county jail? 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

West Brom vs Birmingham: Live stream commentary and confirmed teams

first_img Che Adams needs to score the goals to secure Birmingham’s Championship status Meanwhile, under caretaker boss James Shan, West Brom can close the gap on the top-two to four points with a win over Birmingham. West Brom vs Birmingham: Kick-off timeThe game kicks off at 8pm at the Hawthorns on Friday, 29 March.West Brom vs Birmingham: How to listenFull commentary will be exclusively live on talkSPORT 2, with our coverage getting underway at 8pm.Click here for the live stream or click the radio player below.West Brom vs Birmingham: Confirmed teamsWest Brom: Johnstone, Holgate, Dawson, Hegazi, Townsend, Livermore, Morrison, Brunt, Edwards, Gayle, Rodriguez.Birmingham: Camp, Colin, Morrison, Dean, Pedersen, G Gardner, Davis, Maghoma, Mahoney, Adams, Jutkiewicz. 1 LIVE on talkSPORTcenter_img West Brom vs Birmingham (Friday, 8pm) – talkSPORT 2Brighton vs Southampton (Saturday, 3pm) – talkSPORT 2West Ham vs Everton (Saturday, 5:30pm) – talkSPORTMiddlesbrough vs Norwich (Saturday, 5:30pm) – talkSPORT 2Portsmouth vs Sunderland (Sunday, 2:30pm) – talkSPORT 2 Birmingham will be hoping to put some distance between themselves and the bottom three when they travel to West Brom on Friday, live on talkSPORT 2.Last week, the Blues were slapped with a nine-point deduction after breaching financial rules, meaning Garry Monk’s side have dropped from 13th to 18th and are are just five points above the relegation zone. talkSPORT is your home of live football! Here’s what’s coming up on talkSPORT and talkSPORT 2… last_img read more

The Zellman Group Shows Amazing Support for The Loss Prevention Foundation by Becoming the…

first_imgThe Loss Prevention Foundation (LPF) has announced that The Zellman Group has advanced its partnership to become the newest Doctorate level scholarship partner. Zellman has been a long-time Bachelor-level partner and supporter of the LPF and with their commitment to becoming a Doctorate level partner they are continuing to set an example to the industry regarding the importance of continued education. The Doctorate level partnership secures numerous certification course scholarships for distribution to retailers, universities and internal associates. It also enables Zellman to provide complimentary LPF memberships to loss prevention practitioners.The Zellman Group, headquartered in Greenvale, NY, was started in 1997 by founder and president, Stuart Levine. Zellman is a loss prevention services and consulting company with managed solutions for the retail, food service, and hospitality industries. Their mission is to provide clients with a third-party perspective while preventing loss, maintaining consistency, and maximizing profitability.“The Zellman Group has truly demonstrated their commitment to our industry by advancing their sponsorship from the Bachelor-level to the Doctorate-level,” said Terry Sullivan, LPC, President of the LPF. “Our partners are what make it possible for us to continue to fulfill the mission of the LPF, which is education for the LP industry through our LPQ and LPC certifications. Partners, like Zellman, who believe in and invest in our mission are invaluable to the LPF and I am so excited to continue partnering with them at this advanced level.”- Sponsor – “The Zellman Group has been a proud supporter of the Loss Prevention Foundation since 2015 and is proud to further our commitment to the Doctorate level. We believe that Loss Prevention specific training and education is the foundation to a successful career. By increasing our sponsorship level, it affords us the opportunity to substantially increase the scholarships that we offer the retail community,” said Stuart Levine, CEO of The Zellman Group. “When we are looking to fill positions internally, we always consider the LPC/LPQ candidates first as the designation shows their commitment to the industry.” In the upcoming months Zellman will be announcing their 2020 LPC/LPQ scholarship program.For more information on the LPF and its partners, please visit: https://www.yourlpf.org/page/lpf_valued_partners Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

‘A new day for chemistry’: Molecular CT scan could dramatically speed drug discovery

first_img By Robert F. ServiceOct. 19, 2018 , 1:50 PM M. Martynowycz et al., ChemRxiv (2018), adapted by E. Petersen/Science (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) ‘A new day for chemistry’: Molecular CT scan could dramatically speed drug discovery In chemistry, structure rules because it determines how a molecule behaves. But the two standard ways to map the structure of small organic molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, hormones, and vitamins, have drawbacks. This week, two research teams report they’ve adapted a third technique, commonly used to chart much larger proteins, to determine the precise shape of small organic molecules. The new technique works with vanishingly small samples, is blazing fast, and is surprisingly easy.“I am blown away by this,” says Carolyn Bertozzi, a chemist at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. “The fact that you can get these structures from [a sample] a million times smaller than a speck of dust, that’s beautiful. It’s a new day for chemistry.”The gold standard for determining chemical structures has long been x-ray crystallography. A beam of x-rays is fired at a pure crystal containing millions of copies of a molecule lined up in a single orientation. By tracking how the x-rays bounce off atoms in the crystal, researchers can work out the position of every atom in the molecule. Crystallography can pinpoint atomic positions down to less than 0.1 nanometers, about the size of a sulfur atom. But the technique works best with fairly large crystals, which can be hard to make. “The real lag time is just getting a crystal,” says Brian Stoltz, an organic chemist at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena. “That can take weeks to months to years.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The second approach, known as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, doesn’t require crystals. It infers structures by perturbing the magnetic behavior of atoms in molecules and then tracking their behavior, which changes depending on their atomic neighbors. But NMR also requires a fair amount of starting material. And it’s indirect, which can lead to mapping mistakes with larger druglike molecules.The new approach builds on a technique called electron diffraction, which sends an electron beam through a crystal and, as in x-ray crystallography, determines structure from diffraction patterns. It has been particularly useful in solving the structure of a class of proteins lodged in cell membranes. In this case, researchers first form tiny 2D sheetlike crystals of multiple copies of a protein wedged in a membrane.But in many cases, efforts to grow the protein crystals go awry. Instead of getting single-membrane sheets, researchers end up with numerous sheets stacked atop one another, which can’t be analyzed by conventional electron diffraction. And the crystals can be too small for x-ray diffraction. “We didn’t know what to do with all these crystals,” says Tamir Gonen, an electron crystallography expert at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). So, his team varied the technique: Instead of firing their electron beam from one direction at a static crystal, they rotated the crystal and tracked how the diffraction pattern changed. Instead of a single image, they got what was more like molecular computerized tomography scan. That enabled them to get structures from crystals one-billionth the size of those needed for x-ray crystallography.Gonen says because his interest was in proteins, he never thought much about trying his technique on anything else. But earlier this year, Gonen moved from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Janelia Research Campus in Ashburn, Virginia, to UCLA. There, he teamed up with colleagues, along with Stoltz at Caltech, who wanted to see whether the same approach would work not just with proteins, but with smaller organic molecules. The short answer is it did. On the chemistry preprint server ChemRxiv, the California team reported on Wednesday that when they tried the approach with numerous samples, it worked nearly every time, delivering a resolution on par with x-ray crystallography. The team could even get structures from mixtures of compounds and from materials that had never formally been crystallized and were just scraped off a chemistry purification column. These results all came after just a few minutes of sample preparation and data collection. What’s more, a collaboration of German and Swiss groups independently published similar results using essentially the same technique this week.“I’ve had dreams in my life where I’m looking through a microscope and I see a molecular model with balls and sticks,” Bertozzi says. “They basically find some microcrystalline schmutz on an EM [sample holder], take some data, and there are the balls and sticks I dreamed about. It’s unbelievable it works so well.”Because it does work so smoothly, the new technique could revolutionize fields both inside and outside of research, Bertozzi and others say. Tim Grüne, an electron diffraction expert at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen, Switzerland, who led the European group, notes that pharmaceutical companies build massive collections of crystalline compounds, in which they hunt for potential new drugs. But only about one-quarter to one-third of the compounds form crystals big enough for x-ray crystallography. “This will remove a bottleneck and lead to an explosion of structures,” Grüne says. That could speed the search for promising drug leads in tiny samples of exotic plants and fungi. For crime labs, it could help them quickly identify the latest heroin derivatives hitting the streets. And it could even help Olympics officials clean up sports by making it easier to spot vanishingly small amounts of performance-enhancing drugs. All because structures rule—and are now easier than ever to decipher. The new technique managed to generate structures from a mixture that contained all four of these organic compounds.last_img read more