Title tilts on the horizon as Jason Quigley targets a rapid return

first_imgJASON Quigley will get back to action in early 2020 with a February return likely ahead of potentially huge fights for the Donegal puncher.Quigley – pictured by Valentin Romero – moved to 17-1, 13KOs on Thursday night with a vicious third round stoppage of Abraham Cordero in California.The bout was at super-middleweight and Quigley felt more at ease, weighing in at 164lbs. “I’m excited now for what’s ahead,” Quigley said.“I felt good at that weight. I could fight now at 168lbs or 160lbs. I was talking with Robert Diaz from Golden Boy Promotions and he said it’s up to me, to stay at 160 or move up to 168. “We’ll have a belt on the line in the next couple of fights for me – and then it’s onto a world title.”Quigley will return home for Christmas, staying in training with Paddy Donovan – who fights on December 20 – before taking in a training camp with new coach Andy Lee in January in Los Angeles. Lee was satisfied with Quigley’s showing.“It was a good win against an experienced, season opponent, who doesn’t get stopped,” he said.“It was important that he looked good and there were a couple of signs of improvement. “You could see that he was focussed and he got the guy out of there. “There’ll be bigger challenges ahead and there’ll be bigger improvements, but it was important to get the first one out of the way.” Title tilts on the horizon as Jason Quigley targets a rapid return was last modified: December 6th, 2019 by Chris McNultyShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Using waste to save the world

first_imgMethane burning. The gas, a powerfulfuel, is produced from the decay oforganic material in the biodigester. It’salso a serious greenhouse gas, andburning it for household use renders it farless harmful to the earth’s climate.(Image: National Science Digital Library) Peter Bysshe stirring the holding tank –probably the least pleasant part of owninga biodigester, but not that big a deal.(Image: Jennifer Stern) A dome biodigester under construction. Construction of the reed bed thatperforms the final filtration of thebiodigester’s recycled water. The completed reed bed of Bysshe’sbiodigester.(Images: Agama Energy)Jennifer SternGlobal climate change is a reality, and the only way we, as a nation and a species, are going to avoid catastrophe is to utilise our resources more sensibly.There are lots of ways of decreasing waste, saving water and generating alternative energy. But there’s one piece of technology that does all three at once – a biodigester. And the Overstrand Municipality on the Western Cape’s southern coastline is the first local authority in South Africa to pass plans for one in an urban area.That’s quite a big step, because biodigesters deal with the unmentionables we all prefer not to think about. But it’s not thinking that creates so many problems. Let’s face it, none of us likes to really reflect on what happens after we flush the toilet, but the reality is that we use litres and litres of perfectly good drinking water to flush away our waste, which is then processed at the cost of quite a bit of energy before being released into the sea or river systems.More and more people are realising that they are flushing away good quality nutrients and energy, and so are looking at alternative ways of dealing with human waste – and have discovered loads of benefits. It’s all about thinking of it as a resource, not just something we need to get rid of. One such person is Peter Bysshe. When he bought his house in Stanford, he needed to decide whether to install a new septic tank, or to go for a biodigester.“I took the long view,” he says. “It cost about 15 or 20 grand more, but it was worth it.”Bysshe’s main motivation was to recycle the water he and his family used in the house to water the large garden. “But I’m not saying no to free gas,” he says with a smile.The Bysshe family of four, plus domestic staff, do all their cooking on methane produced by the biodigester.“We came on line during the load shedding in 2007,” Bysshe says, obviously pretty pleased with his timing. In 2007 and early 2008 South Africa was hit by a series of planned power outages after rapid economic growth put a strain on the country’s electricity grid.“It takes about three or four weeks before you start getting gas. We’ve been going for 16 months, now and it’s been great Once or twice it’s been low, but the next day it’s up again.”A forward-thinking municipalityBysshe lives in the pretty country town of Stanford, part of the Overstrand Municipality, which includes the coastal towns of Hermanus and Gansbaai that are famous, respectively, for southern right whales and great white sharks. Country towns can be quite conservative, so Bysshe was pleasantly surprised with the response when he applied for permission to build the biodigester.“They wrote to DWAF [Department of Water Affairs and Forestry] and asked what the requirements were. We had to put in an additional baffler system before it flows into the reed bed – to purify the water more. They wanted it to get to the point that, when I was watering the garden, I wasn’t contaminating the ground water.“They took groundwater readings before we built it, and they check it every year.”How it all worksBiodigesters are pretty simple. The main fermentation tank looks rather like a giant pizza oven buried in the ground. Obviously, gravity plays an important role in the process so the level of the bottom of the tank, or dome, is dictated by the fall necessary to get the waste from all the toilets and drains in the house.All the waste from the drains and toilets flows into a holding tank, and then into the dome. A separate inlet with a cast-iron cover allows users to add kitchen waste, garden waste and other organic material.In the dome, all the organic material ferments to form methane, which is tapped off and piped to the stove in the house. Waste water flows from the bottom of the dome through a series of anaerobic baffled reactor tanks, also called expansion tanks, which progressively remove remaining pathogens from the water by simply allowing them to die through lack of oxygen.The holding tank and all the baffler tanks are accessed by simply removing their cast-iron covers. All of these processes happen underground.From the last tank, the water flows into a bed of reeds, which do the final purification of the water. The reed bed is an open pond filled with course stones to a level higher than the overflow. So the reeds grow directly in the water but – to all appearances – are growing in course gravel.Any pollutants remaining in the water nourish the growing reeds so that, once they have utilised all available nutrients, the water is clean enough be used on the garden, thus re-entering the groundwater system.Maintenance is minimalUsing a biodigester is taking control of the process of waste disposal – unlike the head-in-the-sand approach of most urban people. It requires a certain amount of dedication, but the maintenance is minimal.“You have to stir it about once a week,” Bysshe says. “Otherwise it cakes up. You want to keep it as liquid as possible. You stir it with a paddle. There is a slight odour when you open it, but it’s not like a honey sucker.” (“Honey sucker” is the rather euphemistic name for the tanker trucks that suck raw sewage from tanker trucks.)It’s not a very high-tech process. He opens the tank up, shoves in an old scaffolding board and – well – stirs. I watched him doing it and, while it’s certainly not jasmine or orange blossom, the smell isn’t that bad. It’s definitely less offensive than a long drop – not that that’s saying much, I know. And when it is closed there is no smell at all.The system must be adequately fed. As well as all the toilet discharge and grey water – water used for bathing and washing dishes, for example – Bysshe adds kitchen waste, grass cuttings, bits of paper, and even dog poo.“Everything in moderation,” he says. “If it hasn’t had grass, for example, you introduce it slowly.”  A diagram of Agama Energy’s domestic biodigester (Image: Agama Energy) Saving resources and saving the worldWhile the primary objective is to effectively and efficiently utilise all the resources at hand, a biodigester also reduces your carbon footprint by burning methane, thereby turning it into carbon dioxide, instead of letting it escape into the atmosphere.“Methane is 23 times worse than CO2,” says Neil Parker, an engineer working for Agama Energy, the company that designed the biodigester.  What that means is methane – the ultimate greenhouse gas – traps 23 times more of the sun’s energy than carbon dioxide.While Parker’s company have produced Bysshe’s and one or two other domestic units, they aim to focus on larger projects, where economies of scale would make the whole thing more affordable.“We’re trying to start a rural biogas programme,” he says. “What you want to encourage is setting up small scale biogas plants at individual household level. Guys who have a few cattle, and can get manure, they can use that for fuel.“It improves their lifestyle tenfold. They’re not walking 10 kilometres a day to get firewood, and it burns cleaner, so there’s less health risk.Most of the biodigesters set up so far in and around Cape Town have been built from scratch out of bricks – an expensive exercise. But Parker says they’re looking at cheaper ways of mass-producing the domes, which are usually the most expensive parts to build.“At the moment we are developing a tank. We’re going to make the first ones from fibreglass, and then we’ll start rotomoulding them in plastic.”Bysshe says it’s a win-win situation.“The benefits are huge. The water and the gas, and ultimately, it’s sustainable. We’re creating a positive impact on the environment. It’s the difference between being green and being sustainable. This is sustainable.”Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Mary Alexander at marya@mediaclubsouthafrica.comRelated articlesGreenpeace takes on Africa Bikes for Africa – from bamboo Power from the African sunUseful linksAgama EnergyOverstrand MunicipalityDepartment of Water Affairs and Forestrylast_img read more

West Virginia Sets 2018 Wholesale Prices for Motor Fuels

first_imgWest Virginia has set the 2018 average wholesale prices of motor fuels, which will be used to set tax rates during 2018. Specifically, the wholesale average price is used to determine sales and use taxes on motor fuel. In West Virginia, the sales tax on motor fuels, also called the motor fuel excise tax, is composed of:a flat rate, plusa variable component of 5% of the average wholesale price of each fuel.Average Wholesale Prices for FuelsStatewide average wholesale prices have been set for both conventional and “alternative” motor fuels.Conventional Motor FuelsThe average wholesale price on conventional motor fuels is $3.040 per gallon. As a result, the variable fuel tax rate remains at 15.2 cents per gallon. The combined total tax is 35.7 cents per gallon. Conventional motor fuels include gasoline, diesel, and kerosene.“Alternative” Motor FuelsFor liquefied petroleum gas, such as propane, the average wholesale price  is $1.008 per gallon. Thus, the variable fuel tax rate is 5 cents per gallon. The combined total rate is 20 cents per gallon.For compressed natural gas, the average wholesale price is $4.982 per 1,000 cubic feet. As a result, the variable fuel tax rate is:24.9 cents per 1,000 cubic feet; or3.2 cents per gasoline gallon equivalent.The combined total rate is 23.7 cents per gallon.Finally, the average wholesale price for liquefied natural gas is 40.6 cents per gallon. The variable fuel tax rate is 2 cents per gasoline gallon equivalent.  Thus, the combined total rate is 15.2 cents per gallon.Administrative Notice 2017-21, West Virginia State Tax Department, November 21, 2017, ¶401-290Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

Adolescent daily users more likely to obtain electronic cigarettes from commercial sources

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 19 2019University of Cincinnati research on adolescent use of electronic cigarettes was featured prominently at the American Academy of Health Behavior 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting on Monday, March 11, in Greenville, South Carolina.”Electronic Cigarette Acquisition Means Among Adolescent Daily Users” earned Ashley Merianos, an assistant professor with UC”s School of Human Services, the 2019 Judy K. Black Award, which is presented by the AAHB in recognition of early-career health behavior research that is innovative and rigorous and that makes an important contribution to science or practice.Merianos’ research is a reflection of UC’s commitment to solving urban issues related to health and well-being, prevention, quality care, researching the next cure, equality in access and talent development. Urban Health and Urban Impact are key components of the university’s strategic direction, Next Lives Here.Merianos performed a secondary analysis of the 2016 National Youth Tobacco Survey and found that of 1,579 adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 who had admitted to using electronic cigarettes within the last 30 days of the survey, 13.6 percent were daily users. Her research further found that those daily users were far more likely to obtain their electronic cigarettes and accessories from commercial sources than their non-daily using counterparts.Adolescents for whom electronic cigarette use was a daily habit were 5.2 times more likely to buy their e-cigarettes from a drug store, 4.4 times more likely to get them from a vape shop, and 3.3 times more likely to purchase them from a mall kiosk.Daily users were also more likely to purchase their e-cigarettes and vaping supplies online, albeit to a lesser degree; they were 2.5 times more likely to make online purchases than non-daily users. “The internet is very hard to regulate, especially for e-cigarette sales,” Merianos says.Related StoriesResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeNew therapeutic food boosts key growth-promoting gut microbes in malnourished childrenDaily intake for phosphates in infants, children can exceed health guidance valuesConversely, non-daily electronic cigarette users were found to be slightly more likely to turn to their friends or family members to obtain vaping products.Merianos recommends that local and state governments adopt 21 as the age of legal purchase to prevent adolescents from getting them, as well as restricting e-cigarette sales from commercial and Internet sources. “We need to inform parents and community members about where their children are getting e-cigarettes from so that they can act as gatekeepers to prevent their children from obtaining these products,” Merianos says. “Also, we need tobacco-use prevention programs to add information on e-cigarettes.”Merianos, who is also an affiliate member of the Division of Emergency Medicine at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, gave an oral presentation of her research at the AAHB conference on Monday, March 11, and a poster presentation the following day.The early-career award from the AAHB is the latest accolade for Merianos, who has garnered national and international media attention for her research on child secondhand and thirdhand smoke exposure. Her work has been featured in online and print media outlets including The New York Times, ABC News and Yahoo News. Merianos has received early career awards from UC and professional organizations.Source: https://www.uc.edu/news/articles/2019/03/n2072609.htmllast_img read more

Researchers study reason for burden of HLBS disorders in south rural communities

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)May 23 2019People born in rural communities in the South, especially in southern Appalachia and the Mississippi Delta, may live shorter and less healthy lives than their counterparts elsewhere in the country, in part due to a high burden of heart, lung, blood and sleep disorders (HLBS). Within the same Southern regions, however, there are counties with very low risk of disease that have profiles of economic disadvantages, race/ethnicity, and rurality similar to those considered high risk.In an effort to understand why certain factors amplify risk in some rural counties and what renders some communities more resilient, researchers will be studying 4,000 multi-ethnic participants from 10 of the low-income rural counties in Kentucky, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana recruited into a new longitudinal cohort study. The Risk Underlying Rural Areas Longitudinal Study (RURAL) will allow researchers to learn what causes the burden of HLBS disorders in these communities and how to alleviate them.This multi-site prospective cohort study will be coordinated by Boston University School of Medicine’s Vasan Ramachandran, MD, FAHA, FACC, principal investigator and Boston University director of the renowned Framingham Heart Study, with which he has been affiliated for more than 20 years. Over fifty investigators at 16 institutions will participate in this six-year, $21.4 million study funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health.Using a self-contained mobile examination unit, ‘a research center on wheels,’ a transdisciplinary team will conduct an approximately four-hour detailed baseline examination on the study participants. Familial, lifestyle and behavioral factors, along with medical history including risk for HLBS disorders will be recorded. Environmental and economic factors also will be studied and standard and novel risk factors for HLBS disorders will be assayed. Investigators will use smart phones and wearable activity monitors in order to help collect health and lifestyle information of the participants. The rural health challenge in the South does not spare any race or ethnicity. These high risk and economically disadvantaged rural communities are vulnerable to clusters of multiple health problems. We aim to understand the rural health challenges in the South and share our findings with and offer health education to these rural communities.”Vasan Ramachandran, Boston University School of Medicine Stephanie Boone, PhD, MPH, University of Louisville (Kentucky); Stephanie Broyles, PhD, LSU’s Pennington Biomedical Research Center; Ervin Fox, MD, MPH, University of Mississippi Medical Center; Suzanne Judd, PhD, University of Alabama at Birmingham and Paul Targonski, MD, PhD, University of Virginia at Charlottesville will play a central role in participant recruitment, retention, follow-up, data collection, return of results, community engagement and education.Source: Boston University School of Medicinelast_img read more

Tesla shareholders reject bid to strip Musk of chairman role

first_imgTesla CEO Elon Musk has rebuffed a shareholder attempt to overhaul the electric car maker’s board and strip him of his role as chairman, despite worries about the company’s shaky finances and inability to meet its production goals for its first mass-market sedan. Explore further Tesla reveals plans to build cars in Shanghai In this Dec. 2, 2015, file photo, Tesla Motors Inc. CEO Elon Musk delivers a speech at the Paris Pantheon Sorbonne University as part of the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris. Musk has rebuffed a shareholder attempt to overhaul the electric car maker’s board and strip him of his role as chairman, despite worries about the company’s shaky finances and inability to meet its production goals for its first mass-market sedan. All three directors seeking to remain on Tesla’s nine-member board were re-elected during the company’s annual meeting Tuesday, June 5, 2018, as most shareholders opposed a rebellion seeking to remove them. (AP Photo/Francois Mori, File) All three directors seeking to remain on Tesla’s nine-member board were re-elected during the company’s annual meeting held Tuesday in Mountain View, California.Directors Antonio Gracias, James Murdoch and Elon’s brother, Kimbal Musk, won by “a wide margin,” according to Tesla. CtW Investment Group, an activist firm that represents labor union pension funds, had spearheaded a rebellion seeking to oust the trio from the board on the grounds that they didn’t know about the auto industry at a critical time in Tesla’s existence.The company said a “supermajority” of shareholders also rejected a proposal to force Musk to step down as Tesla’s chairman, a position he has held since 2004—four years before he also assumed the CEO job.The precise voting totals will be disclosed within the next few days.Elon Musk holds a 22 percent stake in Tesla, increasing the degree of difficulty for shareholders trying to challenge his authority. After the results were announced, he sought to reassure shareholders attending the meeting and others watching on a webcast.After describing the past few months as among the most “hellish” in his life, Musk said he expected Tesla to post a quarterly profit during the July-September period. That’s something the Palo Alto, California, company has rarely pulled off in a 15-year history marked by steady losses while investing heavily in its technology and manufacturing plants.Tesla has been burning through so much cash—more than $1 billion during the first three months of this year alone—that investors have been worrying it will have to sell more stock or add to its already hefty debt load to raise enough money to survive.After conceding that “staying alive” is difficult in the auto industry, Musk told shareholders that Tesla will be “cash flow positive” during the second half of this year. If Musk is correct, the prediction will translate into Tesla bringing in more cash than it’s spending in both the third and fourth quarters.To do that, Tesla will probably have to meet Musk’s manufacturing goals for its Model 3, a sedan with a starting price tag of $35,000 that represents the company’s attempt to reach a mass market. Tesla still needs to more than double its recent production rate to reach Musk’s target of delivering 5,000 Model 3s per week. Musk reiterated previous predictions that that will happen during the second half of this year.Tesla’s stock gained about 1 percent to $294.35 in Tuesday’s extended trading. That’s about 24 percent below its all-time high set in September at $389.61center_img © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Citation: Tesla shareholders reject bid to strip Musk of chairman role (2018, June 6) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-tesla-shareholders-musk-chairman-role.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more