Adolescent daily users more likely to obtain electronic cigarettes from commercial sources

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 19 2019University of Cincinnati research on adolescent use of electronic cigarettes was featured prominently at the American Academy of Health Behavior 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting on Monday, March 11, in Greenville, South Carolina.”Electronic Cigarette Acquisition Means Among Adolescent Daily Users” earned Ashley Merianos, an assistant professor with UC”s School of Human Services, the 2019 Judy K. Black Award, which is presented by the AAHB in recognition of early-career health behavior research that is innovative and rigorous and that makes an important contribution to science or practice.Merianos’ research is a reflection of UC’s commitment to solving urban issues related to health and well-being, prevention, quality care, researching the next cure, equality in access and talent development. Urban Health and Urban Impact are key components of the university’s strategic direction, Next Lives Here.Merianos performed a secondary analysis of the 2016 National Youth Tobacco Survey and found that of 1,579 adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 who had admitted to using electronic cigarettes within the last 30 days of the survey, 13.6 percent were daily users. Her research further found that those daily users were far more likely to obtain their electronic cigarettes and accessories from commercial sources than their non-daily using counterparts.Adolescents for whom electronic cigarette use was a daily habit were 5.2 times more likely to buy their e-cigarettes from a drug store, 4.4 times more likely to get them from a vape shop, and 3.3 times more likely to purchase them from a mall kiosk.Daily users were also more likely to purchase their e-cigarettes and vaping supplies online, albeit to a lesser degree; they were 2.5 times more likely to make online purchases than non-daily users. “The internet is very hard to regulate, especially for e-cigarette sales,” Merianos says.Related StoriesResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeNew therapeutic food boosts key growth-promoting gut microbes in malnourished childrenDaily intake for phosphates in infants, children can exceed health guidance valuesConversely, non-daily electronic cigarette users were found to be slightly more likely to turn to their friends or family members to obtain vaping products.Merianos recommends that local and state governments adopt 21 as the age of legal purchase to prevent adolescents from getting them, as well as restricting e-cigarette sales from commercial and Internet sources. “We need to inform parents and community members about where their children are getting e-cigarettes from so that they can act as gatekeepers to prevent their children from obtaining these products,” Merianos says. “Also, we need tobacco-use prevention programs to add information on e-cigarettes.”Merianos, who is also an affiliate member of the Division of Emergency Medicine at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, gave an oral presentation of her research at the AAHB conference on Monday, March 11, and a poster presentation the following day.The early-career award from the AAHB is the latest accolade for Merianos, who has garnered national and international media attention for her research on child secondhand and thirdhand smoke exposure. Her work has been featured in online and print media outlets including The New York Times, ABC News and Yahoo News. Merianos has received early career awards from UC and professional organizations.Source: https://www.uc.edu/news/articles/2019/03/n2072609.htmllast_img read more

Researchers study reason for burden of HLBS disorders in south rural communities

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)May 23 2019People born in rural communities in the South, especially in southern Appalachia and the Mississippi Delta, may live shorter and less healthy lives than their counterparts elsewhere in the country, in part due to a high burden of heart, lung, blood and sleep disorders (HLBS). Within the same Southern regions, however, there are counties with very low risk of disease that have profiles of economic disadvantages, race/ethnicity, and rurality similar to those considered high risk.In an effort to understand why certain factors amplify risk in some rural counties and what renders some communities more resilient, researchers will be studying 4,000 multi-ethnic participants from 10 of the low-income rural counties in Kentucky, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana recruited into a new longitudinal cohort study. The Risk Underlying Rural Areas Longitudinal Study (RURAL) will allow researchers to learn what causes the burden of HLBS disorders in these communities and how to alleviate them.This multi-site prospective cohort study will be coordinated by Boston University School of Medicine’s Vasan Ramachandran, MD, FAHA, FACC, principal investigator and Boston University director of the renowned Framingham Heart Study, with which he has been affiliated for more than 20 years. Over fifty investigators at 16 institutions will participate in this six-year, $21.4 million study funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health.Using a self-contained mobile examination unit, ‘a research center on wheels,’ a transdisciplinary team will conduct an approximately four-hour detailed baseline examination on the study participants. Familial, lifestyle and behavioral factors, along with medical history including risk for HLBS disorders will be recorded. Environmental and economic factors also will be studied and standard and novel risk factors for HLBS disorders will be assayed. Investigators will use smart phones and wearable activity monitors in order to help collect health and lifestyle information of the participants. The rural health challenge in the South does not spare any race or ethnicity. These high risk and economically disadvantaged rural communities are vulnerable to clusters of multiple health problems. We aim to understand the rural health challenges in the South and share our findings with and offer health education to these rural communities.”Vasan Ramachandran, Boston University School of Medicine Stephanie Boone, PhD, MPH, University of Louisville (Kentucky); Stephanie Broyles, PhD, LSU’s Pennington Biomedical Research Center; Ervin Fox, MD, MPH, University of Mississippi Medical Center; Suzanne Judd, PhD, University of Alabama at Birmingham and Paul Targonski, MD, PhD, University of Virginia at Charlottesville will play a central role in participant recruitment, retention, follow-up, data collection, return of results, community engagement and education.Source: Boston University School of Medicinelast_img read more

Tesla shareholders reject bid to strip Musk of chairman role

first_imgTesla CEO Elon Musk has rebuffed a shareholder attempt to overhaul the electric car maker’s board and strip him of his role as chairman, despite worries about the company’s shaky finances and inability to meet its production goals for its first mass-market sedan. Explore further Tesla reveals plans to build cars in Shanghai In this Dec. 2, 2015, file photo, Tesla Motors Inc. CEO Elon Musk delivers a speech at the Paris Pantheon Sorbonne University as part of the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris. Musk has rebuffed a shareholder attempt to overhaul the electric car maker’s board and strip him of his role as chairman, despite worries about the company’s shaky finances and inability to meet its production goals for its first mass-market sedan. All three directors seeking to remain on Tesla’s nine-member board were re-elected during the company’s annual meeting Tuesday, June 5, 2018, as most shareholders opposed a rebellion seeking to remove them. (AP Photo/Francois Mori, File) All three directors seeking to remain on Tesla’s nine-member board were re-elected during the company’s annual meeting held Tuesday in Mountain View, California.Directors Antonio Gracias, James Murdoch and Elon’s brother, Kimbal Musk, won by “a wide margin,” according to Tesla. CtW Investment Group, an activist firm that represents labor union pension funds, had spearheaded a rebellion seeking to oust the trio from the board on the grounds that they didn’t know about the auto industry at a critical time in Tesla’s existence.The company said a “supermajority” of shareholders also rejected a proposal to force Musk to step down as Tesla’s chairman, a position he has held since 2004—four years before he also assumed the CEO job.The precise voting totals will be disclosed within the next few days.Elon Musk holds a 22 percent stake in Tesla, increasing the degree of difficulty for shareholders trying to challenge his authority. After the results were announced, he sought to reassure shareholders attending the meeting and others watching on a webcast.After describing the past few months as among the most “hellish” in his life, Musk said he expected Tesla to post a quarterly profit during the July-September period. That’s something the Palo Alto, California, company has rarely pulled off in a 15-year history marked by steady losses while investing heavily in its technology and manufacturing plants.Tesla has been burning through so much cash—more than $1 billion during the first three months of this year alone—that investors have been worrying it will have to sell more stock or add to its already hefty debt load to raise enough money to survive.After conceding that “staying alive” is difficult in the auto industry, Musk told shareholders that Tesla will be “cash flow positive” during the second half of this year. If Musk is correct, the prediction will translate into Tesla bringing in more cash than it’s spending in both the third and fourth quarters.To do that, Tesla will probably have to meet Musk’s manufacturing goals for its Model 3, a sedan with a starting price tag of $35,000 that represents the company’s attempt to reach a mass market. Tesla still needs to more than double its recent production rate to reach Musk’s target of delivering 5,000 Model 3s per week. Musk reiterated previous predictions that that will happen during the second half of this year.Tesla’s stock gained about 1 percent to $294.35 in Tuesday’s extended trading. That’s about 24 percent below its all-time high set in September at $389.61center_img © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Citation: Tesla shareholders reject bid to strip Musk of chairman role (2018, June 6) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-tesla-shareholders-musk-chairman-role.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more