Missouri officials say flood damage to roads more than $29M

first_img(AP) – Missouri officials say widespread flooding has cost an estimated $29 million in damages to roads and bridges, and dozens of other sites haven’t even been evaluated yet.Missouri Department of Transportation records presented during a Wednesday commission meeting show the agency has spent more than $12 million on flood-related repairs since March.The agency projects at least another $16.8 million in damages. But that only accounts for 83 sites that have been assessed for damage so far. Another 100 sites still need to be evaluated.Tornadoes, storms and flooding have wreaked havoc on homes, farmland and infrastructure throughout the state this year.Missouri Gov. Mike Parson declared a state of emergency in March, and President Donald Trump on Tuesday approved the state’s second federal disaster declaration of the year.last_img read more

2016 SEC Tournament Bracket, Schedule, Analysis

first_imgSEC logo.SEC men’s basketball has felt like a one-horse race for a few years now, but things became much more interesting in 2015-16. Kentucky is still among the league’s elite, of course, and John Calipari’s Wildcats appear to be hitting their stride at the right time heading into post-season play. They didn’t win the regular season, however. A consistent, well-rounded Texas A&M club took home that title, and head into the tournament on a six game winning streak, which includes a ‘W’ against UK. South Carolina, the three seed, has its best team in over a decade, and is set to make its first NCAA Tournament since 2004. LSU has a little forward named Ben Simmons, who you’ve probably heard a bit about. This should be a very fun conference tournament. SEC Tournament ticket information is available here.Here is the full bracket:2016 sec tournament SEC Tournament games will be aired on SEC Network and ESPN.Favorite: Kentuckykentucky logoTexas A&M may have the top seed in the tournament, but Kentucky enters the event as the favorite to win the whole thing. Bovada has the Wildcats at +120 to win the SEC Tournament, while A&M is listed at +375. Kentucky has the top backcourt in the conference, and maybe the entire country. Jamal Murray has proven to be an incredibly dynamic shooting guard, scoring an even 20 points a game from all over the court. The freshman out of Canada is shooting 45-percent from the floor, and 42-percent from three, and he’s incredibly difficult to keep out of the lane. He’s joined by SEC Player of the Year contender Tyler Ulis, one of basketball’s best lead guards. Ulis averages 16.6 points and 7.3 assists per game, and is a fantastic floor general for John Calipari’s ‘Cats. The X-factor for Kentucky is Skal Labissiere. The big man out of Haiti entered the year as a rival to fellow freshman Ben Simmons as the top newcomer to college basketball, but was largely a disappointment this season. However, he’s played two of his best games in the last week. Labissiere chipped in 11 points and eight boards in just 15 minutes in a win over Florida, and looked dominant against Simmons’ LSU Tigers, with 18 points, nine rebounds, and six blocks in 25 minutes in Kentucky’s 94-77 win. If Skal continues to improve, UK will be a difficult out in SEC play, and a menace in the Big Dance.Sleeper: Ole Missole miss logoIf we look beyond the four teams that have byes into the quarterfinals, we’ll take Ole Miss as a potential sleeper. The Rebels can be a bit of a one-man show, but that one man can really fill up a box score. Stefan Moody, Ben Simmons’ choice for the SEC’s best point guard, leads the conference in scoring at 23.1 points per game. He’s a high-flyer, and he drops bombs from beyond the three-point arc. Ole Miss is far from a well-rounded team, but they have a game-breaking guard, and in one-off tournament basketball, a great point guard can absolutely take over, especially when he’s as skilled at scoring as Moody is.last_img read more

Spotted Canada Receives Its Greenest Naval Ship

first_imgImage Courtesy: Davie Shipbuilding M/V Asterix, a former containership, has been retrofitted to a naval vessel at Davie Shipbuilding in Quebec. Commissioning of all the Asterix’s onboard systems and sea trials are underway and the ship will be heading to Halifax, Nova Scotia, in early December.The auxiliary oiler replenishment ship is the very first naval fleet auxiliary vessel to join Green Marine, the largest voluntary environmental certification program for North America’s maritime industry.What is more, Asterix is said to be the largest naval vessel ever to be delivered from a Canadian shipyard. Equally suited for combat and humanitarian operations, the vessel is equipped with environmental features.‘’It’s the greenest naval ship ever built in Canada. It has a double hull and a deck specifically designed for spill prevention, along with the latest innovations such as Terragon’s MAGS system for the safe and green disposal of garbage,’’ Spencer Fraser, CEO of Federal Fleet Services, Davie’s sister shipbuilding company, commented.The Micro Auto Gasification System (MAGS) is the world’s most compact, efficient and environmentally safe technology for the conversion of a variety of combustible materials into thermal energy for the ship’s use, as explained by Green Marine. The vessel is also ready to receive a ballast water treatment system once International Maritime Organization (IMO) regulations come into force.The Green Marine environmental program offers a roadmap for shipowners, port authorities, terminal operators and shipyard managers to voluntarily reduce their environmental footprint.“Our Canadian crew is ready to begin operations alongside the Royal Canadian Navy,” Fraser added.The vessel can accommodate 114 military personnel in addition to the 36 members of its civilian crew.last_img read more

Interdisciplinary medication education improves patient outcomes reduces hospital readmissions

first_img After a patient is admitted, an assigned bedside nurse reviews any new medications with the patient, family member, or caregiver, including what they are used for and any side effects of that particular medication. “This can be easily done through patient medication cards that are premade and ready to go,” See said. Once the discharge medications have been prescribed by the physician, the cardiology nurse navigator asks the patient to write out medication information on a visual aid form called a medication log. This include the names of their discharge medications, what the medications are used for, dose, frequency and what time of day the medications should be taken. See said, “This can be done in conjunction with the floor pharmacist’s instructions at discharge or done separately depending on similar availability.” Next, the floor pharmacist educates the patient in greater depth about their medications, explaining potential side effects and any drug interactions, what to do if a dose is missed and offering any other needed instructions. After discharge, the patient will receive a transition of care phone call within 48 hours from a care coordinator or the nurse navigator. This call includes medication teach back, which requires the patient to read back from memory or read from their prescription bottles the name and usage of their medication. At the patient’s first outpatient cardiac rehab appointment, they are asked to place a check mark by their current medications from a list of common cardiac medications. This helps ensure they are knowledgeable about their medications. Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 14 2019Patients understanding their medications and taking them as instructed are important parts of improving the care and outcomes of heart attack patients, as well as potentially reducing avoidable readmissions, according to research presented at the ACC Quality Summit in New Orleans.A heart attack is typically an unexpected event, which can leave patients overwhelmed by new medications, clinicians and other additions to their health care upon release from the hospital. When patients are discharged from the hospital, hospital staff educate them about their medications. However, many patients have difficulty understanding and following these instructions.A new quality improvement plan, developed at Olathe Medical Center in Olathe, Kansas, and initiated as part of the American College of Cardiology’s Patient Navigator Program: Focus MI, showed promising results and shed light on how to approach the issue. The study group considered the patient perspective on the hospital discharge and follow-up experience when developing solutions.”When patients leave a hospital, they often feel there has been little preparation for the discharge plan of care,” said Tara See, RN, BSN, Olathe Medical Center and a leader in the initiative. “Another complaint is that follow-up care is not well established at discharge, there is limited communication with providers receiving them after hospitalization, medication reconciliation and instructions may be hard to understand, and expectations are unclear regarding their recovery and needs when they are discharged.”In April 2018, an interdisciplinary team at Olathe Medical Center, including an assigned bedside RN, cardiology nurse navigator, floor pharmacists and outpatient cardiac rehab staff, established and implemented the following medication education communication process: Related StoriesChildren’s Colorado granted IAC’s Cardiovascular Catheterization accreditationStudy: Two-thirds of pneumonia patients receive more antibiotics than they probably needHome-based support network helps stroke patients adjust after hospital dischargeUsing the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey–a satisfaction survey required by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for all U.S. hospitals, the study group found the hospital’s HCAHPS scores for medication understanding increased by 10 percent between quarter one and quarter two in 2018 following program implementation. Additionally, before plan implementation, the 2018 quarter one unadjusted readmission rate was 8.2 percent. Since implementation, the quarter two rate went down to 3.4 percent and quarter three was 3.6 percent.”We realize improving medication understanding is only part of what hospitals need to do to help reduce readmissions,” See said. “We are also continuing to focus on other goals, such as increasing risk assessment and appropriate interventions placed on high risk patients. We believe this will optimize our process and further decrease readmissions.”Source: http://www.acc.org/last_img read more

Adolescent daily users more likely to obtain electronic cigarettes from commercial sources

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 19 2019University of Cincinnati research on adolescent use of electronic cigarettes was featured prominently at the American Academy of Health Behavior 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting on Monday, March 11, in Greenville, South Carolina.”Electronic Cigarette Acquisition Means Among Adolescent Daily Users” earned Ashley Merianos, an assistant professor with UC”s School of Human Services, the 2019 Judy K. Black Award, which is presented by the AAHB in recognition of early-career health behavior research that is innovative and rigorous and that makes an important contribution to science or practice.Merianos’ research is a reflection of UC’s commitment to solving urban issues related to health and well-being, prevention, quality care, researching the next cure, equality in access and talent development. Urban Health and Urban Impact are key components of the university’s strategic direction, Next Lives Here.Merianos performed a secondary analysis of the 2016 National Youth Tobacco Survey and found that of 1,579 adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 who had admitted to using electronic cigarettes within the last 30 days of the survey, 13.6 percent were daily users. Her research further found that those daily users were far more likely to obtain their electronic cigarettes and accessories from commercial sources than their non-daily using counterparts.Adolescents for whom electronic cigarette use was a daily habit were 5.2 times more likely to buy their e-cigarettes from a drug store, 4.4 times more likely to get them from a vape shop, and 3.3 times more likely to purchase them from a mall kiosk.Daily users were also more likely to purchase their e-cigarettes and vaping supplies online, albeit to a lesser degree; they were 2.5 times more likely to make online purchases than non-daily users. “The internet is very hard to regulate, especially for e-cigarette sales,” Merianos says.Related StoriesResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeNew therapeutic food boosts key growth-promoting gut microbes in malnourished childrenDaily intake for phosphates in infants, children can exceed health guidance valuesConversely, non-daily electronic cigarette users were found to be slightly more likely to turn to their friends or family members to obtain vaping products.Merianos recommends that local and state governments adopt 21 as the age of legal purchase to prevent adolescents from getting them, as well as restricting e-cigarette sales from commercial and Internet sources. “We need to inform parents and community members about where their children are getting e-cigarettes from so that they can act as gatekeepers to prevent their children from obtaining these products,” Merianos says. “Also, we need tobacco-use prevention programs to add information on e-cigarettes.”Merianos, who is also an affiliate member of the Division of Emergency Medicine at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, gave an oral presentation of her research at the AAHB conference on Monday, March 11, and a poster presentation the following day.The early-career award from the AAHB is the latest accolade for Merianos, who has garnered national and international media attention for her research on child secondhand and thirdhand smoke exposure. Her work has been featured in online and print media outlets including The New York Times, ABC News and Yahoo News. Merianos has received early career awards from UC and professional organizations.Source: https://www.uc.edu/news/articles/2019/03/n2072609.htmllast_img read more

Racial inequality in the deployment of rooftop solar energy in the US

first_imgThe study found that for the same median household income:black-majority census tracts—or neighborhoods—have installed 69 percent less rooftop PV than census tracts (neighborhoods) where no single race or ethnicity makes up the majority (no-majority); and Hispanic-majority census tracts have installed 30 percent less rooftop PV than no-majority census tracts. Meanwhile, white-majority census tracts have installed 21 percent more rooftop PV than no-majority census tracts.When correcting for home ownership, black- and Hispanic-majority census tracts have installed less rooftop PV compared to no-majority tracts by 61 percent and 45 percent, respectively, while white-majority census tracts installed 37 percent more. Although the popularity of rooftop solar panels has skyrocketed because of their benefits to consumers and the environment, the deployment has predominantly occurred in white neighborhoods, even after controlling for household income and home ownership, according to a study by researchers from Tufts University and the University of California, Berkeley, published today in the journal Nature Sustainability. Team locates nearly all US solar panels in a billion images with machine learning More information: Deborah A. Sunter et al, Disparities in rooftop photovoltaics deployment in the United States by race and ethnicity, Nature Sustainability (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41893-018-0204-z Tufts University and the University of California, Berkeley, found that the deployment of rooftop solar panels has predominantly occurred in white neighborhoods, even after controlling for household income and home ownership, according to a study by researchers from Credit: Deborah Sunter, Ph.D., a professor of mechanical engineering at the School of Engineering at Tufts, and the study’s lead author. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Racial inequality in the deployment of rooftop solar energy in the US (2019, January 10) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-racial-inequality-deployment-rooftop-solar.html The study’s authors said more research is needed to help determine the root causes of the differences. They noted that the findings could be useful in developing better and more inclusive energy infrastructure policy and outcomes, including as part of the evolving ‘Green New Deal’ and programs at the state and federal level.”Our work illustrates that while solar can be a powerful tool for climate protection and social equity, a lack of access or a lack of outreach to all segments of society can dramatically weaken the social benefit,” said Daniel Kammen, Ph.D., former science envoy for the U. S. State Department, and current professor and chair of the Energy and Resources Group, professor in the Goldman School of Policy, and professor of Nuclear Engineering at UC Berkeley. Both Sunter and Kammen have been fellows of the Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS), and Castellanos is a fellow at UC Berkeley´s Data for Social Sciences Lab (D-Lab). Tufts University and the University of California, Berkeley, found that the deployment of rooftop solar panels has predominantly occurred in white neighborhoods. Here the analysed region (yellow) contains 58% of the national technical potential for rooftop PV annual energy generation. Credit: Deborah Sunter, Ph.D., a professor of mechanical engineering at the School of Engineering at Tufts, and the study’s lead author. Journal information: Nature Sustainability Explore further Provided by Tufts University While solar energy is a popular, cost-effective, sustainable source of energy that can be deployed at large, utility-scale projects as well as on individual rooftops, deployment of rooftop solar has been uneven.”Solar power is crucial to meeting the climate goals presented by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, but we can and need to deploy solar more broadly so that it benefits all people, regardless of race and ethnicity,” said Deborah Sunter, Ph.D., a professor of mechanical engineering at the School of Engineering at Tufts, and the study’s lead author. “Solar energy can be a resource for climate protection and social empowerment.”Researchers combined data from Google’s Project Sunroof on existing rooftop solar installations across the United States with demographic data, including household income, home ownership, and ethnicity and race, from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. The Project Sunroof data includes information on more than 60 million rooftops, and almost 2 million solar installations.”Advances in remote sensing and in ‘big data’ science enable us not only to take a unique look at where solar is deployed but also to combine that with census and demographic data to chart who gets to benefit from the solar energy revolution,” said Sergio Castellanos, Ph.D., a research faculty at UC Berkeley’s Energy and Resources Group and the California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE). “This information allows us to think more deeply about the effectiveness of current policies and approaches to accelerating solar PV (photovoltaics) deployment.”last_img read more

Woman Dies After Being Impaled by Reusable Metal Straw

first_imgA woman in England died after falling onto a reusable metal straw, which pierced her head, and the tragic accident has renewed debate over bans on plastic straws, according to news reports. The woman, 60-year-old Elena Struthers-Gardner, was carrying a glass with a 10-inch-long stainless-steel straw when she fell and the straw impaled her eye, causing fatal brain injuries, according to the Daily Echo, a British newspaper. Struthers-Gardner had scoliosis, or a sideways curvature of the spine, which made her prone to falls. Struthers-Gardner died in November, and a coroner’s report on her death was released this week, according to The New York Times. The report called her death an accident.Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65925-metal-straw-death.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Several U.S. cities and states have already banned plastic straws to reduce the plastic entering the environment, and a similar ban is set to take effect in England in April 2020, the Times reported. But the bans have sparked concern among people with disabilities and their advocates, who say the bans make straws unavailable for those with disabilities who rely on straws to drink, according to NPR. In addition, the rigidity of reusable metal straws may pose safety risks. “I just feel that in the hands of mobility-challenged people like Elena [Struthers-Gardner], or children, or even able-bodied people losing their footing, these [straws] are so long and very strong,” Mandy Struthers-Gardner, Elena’s wife, said in a statement, the Daily Echo reported. “Even if they don’t end a life, they can be very dangerous.” In 2016, Starbucks recalled 2.5 million stainless-steel straws due to reports of young children who experienced mouth lacerations from using the straws, according to U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Brendan Allen, the assistant coroner involved in Struthers-Gardner’s case, also warned about the potential dangers of metal straws. “Clearly, great care should be taken when using these metal straws. There is no give in them at all,” Allen said. He added that in this case, the metal straw may have been particularly hazardous because it was used with a lid that prevented the straw from moving. “It seems to me these metal straws should not be used with any form of lid that holds them in place,” Allen said. “It seems the main problem here is if the lid hadn’t been in place the straw would have moved away.” In Images: The Great Pacific Garbage Patch In Photos: World’s 10 Most Polluted Places Top 10 Craziest Environmental Ideas Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedVikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoAncestryThe Story Behind Your Last Name Will Surprise YouAncestryUndoDirectExposeThis Baby Elephant Decided To Spend His Last Days Alongside This CreatureDirectExposeUndoScience101This Is The Smartest Dog Breed According To VeterinariansScience101Undolast_img read more